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" A man of a polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving. He can converse with a picture and find an agreeable companion in a statue. "
The Ohio Educational Monthly and the National Teacher: A Journal of Education - Page 311
1877
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A higher English grammar

Alexander Bain - English language - 1872
...for the use of ' that ' in restrictive clauses ; for example : — ' a man of polite imagination ia let into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving.' Both relatives are introduced correctly in this passage : — ' she had learned that from Mrs. Wood,...
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The civil service English grammar

W V. Yates - English language - 1873 - 118 pages
...present 2. to be proud of which In every future KUltf to which 3. ' A man of polite imagination is led into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving; for he can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue.' 4 ' He would not...
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Aids to English Composition Prepared for Students of All Grades

Richard Green Parker - 1875
...to avoid repetition, which is preferable to that, and is undoubtedly so in the present instance. " He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in statue. He meets with a secret refreshment in a description ; and often feels a greater satisfaction...
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes...

Quotations, English - 1876 - 764 pages
...12. A man of a polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures lhat the vulgar are not cnpable of receiving. He can converse with a picture, and...in the possession. It gives him, indeed, a kind of properly in everything he sees, and makes the most rude uncultivated parts of nature administer to...
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The Science of Rhetoric: An Introduction to the Law of Effective Discourse

David Jayne Hill - English language - 1877 - 304 pages
...a perpetual dictatorship. — Steele. (4) He meets with a secret refreshment in a descriptions *nd often feels a greater satisfaction in the prospect...fields and meadows than another does in the possession. — Addison. (6) Ere he thoroughly recovered the shock a wild crj arose. — Charles Beade. (7) Had...
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A School Manual of English Composition: For Advanced Grammar Grades, and for ...

William Swinton - English language - 1877 - 113 pages
...the following from Addison and Macaulay: I. FBOM ADDISON. (The theme): A man of polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving. (First illustration) : He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue....
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A School Manual of English Composition: For Advanced Grammar Grades, and for ...

William Swinton - English language - 1877 - 113 pages
...let into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving. (First ilhistratian) : He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue. (Second illustration) : He meets with a secret refreshment in a description, and often feel? a greater...
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Grammar Containing the Etymology and Syntax of the English Language: For ...

William Swinton - English language - 1878 - 113 pages
...the following from Addison and Macaulay : I. FROM ADDISON. (The theme): A man of polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving. (First illustration) : He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue....
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English Grammar, Historical and Analytical

Joseph Gostwick - English language - 1878 - 472 pages
...comma would not distinctly show the main division. [ 50, Co-ordinative Conjunctions, 1, a, b, c.] ' He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue.' — ADDISON. 'The abbot was freed from the authority of the Metropolitan of Canterbury, and [was] invested...
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A School Manual of English Composition: For Advanced Grammar Grades, and for ...

William Swinton - English language - 1879 - 113 pages
...the following from Addison and Macaulay: I. FBOM ADDISON. (The theme): A man of polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures that the vulgar are not capable of receiving. (First illustration): He can converse with a picture, and .find an agreeable companion in a statue....
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