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" He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry, and pleased, at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The feare of every man that heard him was lest "
'Brief Lives': A-H - Page 68
by John Aubrey, Andrew Clark - 1898
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The penny cyclopędia [ed. by G. Long].

Society for the diffusion of useful knowledge - 1835
...look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke ; and his judges were pleased and angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end. Cicero is iaid to be the only wit...
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Lives of eminent and illustrious Englishmen, ed. by G. G. Cunningham

Englishmen - 1836
...applied to him the compliment passed by Ben Jonson on Lord Verulam :—" He commanded when he spoke; he had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power; and the fear of every man that heard him was lest he should come to an end.'' In general politics,...
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Essays and selections

Basil Montagu - 1837
...speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion, man had their affections more in his power, fear of every man that heard him was lest he sb make an...
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Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volume 2

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English essays - 1840
...Speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end.' From the mention which is made of...
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Works, Volume 2

Francis Bacon - 1841
...but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end. 3 Take for instance any of the Nervous...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 2

Francis Bacon - 1841
...but consisted of his own graces. His hcarcrscoutd not cough, or look •side from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was leet he should make an end. 2 Take for instance any of the Nervous...
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The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health, Volume 3

1841
...look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke; and his judges were pleased or angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end. Cicero is said to be the only wit...
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The American Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 3

Phrenology - 1841
...look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke ; and his judges were pleased or angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest ho should make an end. Cicero is said to be the only wit...
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Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volume 2

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1843
...speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end." From the mention which is made of...
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History of the House of Commons: From the Convention Parliament of ..., Volume 2

1844
...patriots, and a consummate orator. It might be said of him, as Ben Jonson said of the Lord Verulam, that he commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his discretion. No man had their affections more in his power; and the fear of every man that heard him...
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