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Books Books 11 - 20 of 24 on The third requisite in our poet, or maker, is imitation: to be able to convert the....
" The third requisite in our poet, or maker, is imitation: to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use. To make choice of one excellent man above the rest, and so to follow him till he grow very he, or so like him as the... "
Elizabethan Drama, 1558-1642: A History of the Drama in England from the ... - Page 537
by Felix Emmanuel Schelling - 1908 - 1291 pages
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The Case is Altered, Volumes 56-57

Ben Jonson - 1917 - 220 pages
...treatment, he has worked according to his expressed views of what translation and imitation should be — 'to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use.'1 On referring to the parallel passages, it will be seen that, except for a few instances, he...
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The Making of Literature

P. Ramaswamy
...literary " conduct," he finds the third requisite of his poet to be imitation, imitatio — " to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use." (4) And the fourth — " exactness of study and multiplicity of reading, lectio, which maketh a full...
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The Anxiety of Influence: A Theory of Poetry

Harold Bloom - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 157 pages
...melancholy. Ben Jonson still sees influence as health. Of imitation, he says he means: "to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use. To make choice of one excel lent man above the rest, and so to follow him till he grow very he, or...
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Gender and Literacy on Stage in Early Modern England

Eve Rachele Sanders - Drama - 1998 - 260 pages
...both replication and innovation: The third requisite in our poet, or maker, is imitation: to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use: to make choice of one excellent man above the rest, and so to follow him till he grow very he, or so...
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The Later Tudors: England, 1547-1603

Penry Williams - History - 1998 - 606 pages
...'The third requisite in our poet, or maker [after natural wit and exercise] is imitation, to be able to convert the substance, or riches of another poet, to his own use. IMITATION 419 To make choice of one excellent man above the rest, and so to follow him, till he grow...
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Milton, Authorship, and the Book Trade

Stephen B. Dobranski - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 245 pages
...appropriation and "imitation," one of the requisites for being a poet. Jonson praised the true poet's ability to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use. To make choice of one excellent man above the rest, and so to follow him till he grow very he, or so...
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A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture

Michael Hattaway - History - 2002 - 747 pages
...creative adaptation and cautions against mere servile reproduction. To imitate, he writes is to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use. To make choice of one excellent man above the rest and so to follow him as the copy may be mistaken...
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The Cambridge Companion to Ben Jonson

Richard Harp, Stanley Stewart - Biography & Autobiography - 2000 - 218 pages
...theory of the poet's use of tradition: The third requisite of our poet or maker is imitation, to be able to convert the substance, or riches of another poet to his own use. To make choice of one excellent man above the rest, and so to follow him till he grow very he, or so...
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Recreating Jane Austen

John Wiltshire - Literary Collections - 2001 - 179 pages
...from Wordsworth he writes The third requisite in our poet or maker is imitation, imitatio, to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use . . . Not as a creature that swallows what it takes in, crude, raw, or undigested; but that feeds with...
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Curiosities and Texts: The Culture of Collecting in Early Modern England

Marjorie Swann - History - 2001 - 280 pages
..."imitation," which, drawing upon the traditional image of copia as treasure, he defines as the ability "to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use" (Timber, 2490-92). The "substance or riches" of other writers becomes, in turn, "the treasure of [the...
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