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Books Books 91 - 100 of 100 on Egyptian strainers and channels, and came to him not without some tincture of the....
" Egyptian strainers and channels, and came to him not without some tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models of those before him. The poetry of Shakspeare was inspiration indeed : he is not so much an imitator as an instrument of nature ; and... "
Memoirs of the Life of William Shakespeare: With an Essay Toward the ... - Page 209
by Richard Grant White - 1866 - 425 pages
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Neo-Classical Dramatic Criticism 1560-1770

Thora Burnley Jones, Bernard De Bear Nicol - Drama - 1976 - 188 pages
...Originality is also granted to Shakespeare in the frequently quoted passage: 'The Poetry of Shakespeare was Inspiration indeed: he is not so much an Imitator as an Instrument of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks thro' him.'4 This could be read...
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The Critical Reception of Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra from 1607 to 1905

Michael Steppat - Drama - 1980 - 619 pages
...the artistic mediation to almost disappear from critical consciousness: The Poetry of Shake spear was Inspiration indeed: he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument, of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks thro' him. This universal admiration...
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Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Jonson, Shakespeare

James S. Shapiro - Drama - 1991 - 203 pages
...any author deserved the name of an original, it was Shakespeare. . . . The poetry of Shakespeare was inspiration indeed: he is not so much an imitator, as an instrument, of Nature."59 He builds here on Rowe, who wrote that "Shakespeare, on the other hand, was beholding to...
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Reading Readings: Essays on Shakespeare Editing in the Eighteenth Century

Joanna Gondris - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 379 pages
...plays reveal their author's mind (42). Pope prefers Shakespeare to Homer: "The Poetry of Shakespear was Inspiration indeed; he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument of Nature." Shakespeare "seems to have known the world by Intuition, to have look'd thro' humane nature at one...
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Victorian Appropriations of Shakespeare: George Eliot, A.C. Swinburne ...

Robert Sawyer - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 172 pages
...of Nature. Pope strikes a similar note about Shakespeare's "Nature": "The Poetry of Shakespear was Inspiration indeed: he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument, of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks thro' him" (Pope [1743-44] 1969,...
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Motives for Allusion: Context and Content in Nineteenth-century Music

Christopher A. Reynolds - Music - 2003 - 230 pages
...any author deserved the name of an Original, it was Shakespear. . . . The poetry of Shakespear was inspiration indeed: he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. — ALEXANDER POPE1 Why...
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The Politically Incorrect Guide to English and American Literature

Elizabeth Kantor - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 278 pages
...Shakespeare edition, "Homer himself drew not his art so immediately from the fountains of nature ... he is not so much an imitator as an instrument of nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her as that she speaks through him. . . . His characters...
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Shakespeare: una "Tempesta" dopo l'altra

Laura Di Michele - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 359 pages
...Wit, tradizione che Ŕ continuata nei secoli successivi tanto che Pope definirÓ Shakespeare original: "He is not so much an imitator as an instrument of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. His characters are...
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Romanticism: Romanticism and the margins

Michael O'Neill, Mark Sandy - European literature - 2006 - 386 pages
...preface to his 1725 edition of the plays, a classic elevation of Shakespeare to the status of 'nature': 'he is not so much an imitator, as an instrument of nature'. Pope is fulsome in his praise of Shakespeare's characters; Hazlitt writes that the object of his book...
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The Cambridge Companion to Alexander Pope

Pat Rogers - Literary Criticism - 2007
...Shakespeare as an original drew directly "from the fountains of Nature . . . The Poetry of Shakespear was Inspiration indeed: he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument, of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks thro' him" (Prose, n, p. 13 )....
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