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Books Books 91 - 100 of 115 on Sufflaminandus erat,' as Augustus said of Haterius. His wit was in his own power....
" Sufflaminandus erat,' as Augustus said of Haterius. His wit was in his own power ; would the rule of it had been so too ! Many times he fell into those things could not escape laughter, as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him,  "
The plays of William Shakspeare, with the corrections and illustr. of ... - Page 71
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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Shakespeare--who was He?: The Oxford Challenge to the Bard of Avon

Richard F. Whalen - Drama - 1994 - 183 pages
...he flowed with that facility, that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped: Sufflaminandus erat*; as Augustus said of Haterius. His wit was in...been so too. Many times he fell into those things, could not escape laughter; as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him, "Caesar, thou...
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George Eliot's 'Daniel Deronda' Notebooks

George Eliot, Jane Irwin - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 524 pages
...sometimes it was necessary he should /49/ be stopped: Sufflaminandus erat, as Augustus said of Haterius.2 His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too!' [1, 88] Sonnets printed, 1609 [1, 116] New Place bought, 1597. 107 acres, 16023 [1, 81] 1 Ben Jonson,...
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Elizabethan Theater: Essays in Honor of S. Schoenbaum

Samuel Schoenbaum, R. B. Parker, Sheldon P. Zitner - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 324 pages
...expression; wherein he flowed with that facility that sometime it was necessary he should be stopped. His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too."42 What grates with Jonson is the adoration of a Shakespeare who wrote like a gentleman amateur...
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The Genius of Shakespeare

Jonathan Bate - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 384 pages
...expressions, wherein he flowed with that facility that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped . . . His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too. Jonson's praise of Shakespeare's character is unstinting: 'he was indeed honest' roundly confirms Chetde's...
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Shakespeare and the Literary Tradition

Stephen Orgel, Sean Keilen - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 344 pages
...the traditions stemming from them. l* Ben Ionson, I, i33; Shakspere Allusion-Book., I, 274. his owne power; would the rule of it had been so too. Many times hee fell into those things, could not escape laughter But hee redeemed his vices, with his virtues....
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Shakespeare Performed: Essays in Honor of R.A. Foakes

Grace Ioppolo, R. A. Foakes - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 315 pages
...was in his owne power; would the rule of it had beene so too. Many times hee fell into those things, could not escape laughter: As when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him; Caesar, thou dost me wrong. Hee replyed: Caesar did never wrong, but with...
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The Tragedie of Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...he flowed with that facility, that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped: Sufflaminandus erat, as Augustus said of Haterius. His wit was in...been so too. Many times he fell into those things, could not escape laughter: as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him, "Caesar thou...
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Shakespeare and the Poets' War

James Bednarz - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 266 pages
...power;" Jonson writes, "would the rule of it had been so too. Many times he fell into those things, could not escape laughter: As when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him; Caesar, thou dost me wrong. He replied: Caesar did never wrong, but with...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 2

Allardyce Nicoll - Drama - 2002 - 192 pages
...first printed in Discoveries (1640), to the players' boast that Shakespeare "never blotted out line": His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it...been so too. Many times he fell into those things could not escape laughter: as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him: "Caesar thou...
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Shakespeare: For All Time

Stanley W. Wells - Literary Collections - 2003 - 442 pages
...necessary he should be stopped.' The gist of Jonson's criticism is that Shakespeare lacked discipline: 'His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too.' Still, 'he redeemed his vices with his virtues. There was ever more in him to be praised than to be...
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