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Books Books 51 - 60 of 112 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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Modern Classical Philosophers: Selections Illustrating Modern Philosophy ...

Philosophy, Modern - 1908 - 740 pages
...mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun unll not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition,...implies no more contradiction than the affirmation, thai it u'ill rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively...
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Modern Classical Philosophers: Selections Illustrating Modern Philosophy ...

Benjamin Rand - Philosophy, Modern - 1908 - 740 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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English Philosophers of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Philosophy - 1910 - 445 pages
...conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false,...
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Principles of psychology

Herbert Spencer - Philosophy - 1910
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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A History of Philosophy

Frank Thilly - Philosophy - 1914 - 612 pages
...fallacious. Our evidence of the truth of matters of fact is not like the evidence we have in mathematics. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible,...proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than that it will rise. Here we are dealing not with certain, self-evident knowledge, but with probability....
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The Philosophy of Spirit

John Snaith - Apologetics - 1914 - 405 pages
...foregoing.' We have already, in part, shown the incorrectness of this statement. He goes on to say, ' The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible ; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with equal facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality....
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Hume, with Helps to the Study of Berkeley

Thomas Henry Huxley - 1914 - 321 pages
...same manner, nor is an evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

Lewis White Beck - Philosophy - 1966 - 321 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so comformable to...
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David Hume: An Introduction to His Philosophical System

Terence Penelhum - Philosophy - 1992 - 218 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding ; [with] A Letter from a Gentleman ...

David Hume, Eric Steinberg - Philosophy - 1993 - 151 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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