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Books Books 91 - 100 of 106 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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Scottish Philosophy: Selected Readings 1690-1960

Gordon Graham - Philosophy - 2004 - 253 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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Basic Flying Instruction: A Comprehensive Introduction to Western Philosophy

Charles Gidley Wheeler - Philosophy - 2004 - 234 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality....
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Moses Mendelssohns Beschreibung der Wirlichkeit menschlichen Erkennens

Wolfgang Vogt - Metaphysics - 2005 - 250 pages
...faciliry and distinctness, äs if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise to-momtv is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. We should in vain, thereforc, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false,...
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Die Aktualität der Philosophie Kants: Bochumer Ringvorlesung Sommersemester 2004

Kirsten Schmidt, Klaus Steigleder, Burkhard Mojsisch - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2005 - 264 pages
...über die, argumentiert Hume, könne man nichts Allgemeines wissen, jedenfalls nicht mit Sicherheit: »The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and disB. Brecht: Leben des Galilei, Frankfurt...
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Knowledge: Critical Concepts, Volume 1

Nico Stehr, Reiner Grundmann - Philosophy - 2005 - 390 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Spiritual Dimension: Religion, Philosophy and Human Value

John Cottingham - Philosophy - 2005 - 186 pages
...superior.' Alasdair Maclntyre, Dependent Rational Animals (London: Duckworth, 1999), pp. 1-2 and 7. 50 ' That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more a contradiction, than the affirmation that it will rise.' David Hume, An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding...
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Hume's 'Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding': A Reader's Guide

Alan Bailey, Dan O'Brien - Philosophy - 2006 - 160 pages
...conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise. (4.2 / 25-6) This means that if we wish to arrive at true beliefs about objects existing in the real...
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Philosophy, Crime, and Criminology

Bruce A. Arrigo, Christopher R. Williams - Social Science - 2006 - 304 pages
...disconcerting nature of the problem of induction is clearly expressed in one of Hume's best-known statements: "That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise" (1748/1969, p. 197). If our expectations rely on the inductive principle, but its use cannot be logically...
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Theoretical Issues in Psychology: An Introduction

Sacha Bem, Huib Looren de Jong - Psychology - 2006 - 312 pages
...all the cases in the past. There is always room for scepticism, as the empiricist David Hume wrote: That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. (1748/1963: section iv, 25-6, original emphasis) Hume's conclusion of his discussion of induction is...
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Chasing Reality: Strife Over Realism

Mario Bunge - Philosophy - 2006 - 342 pages
...necessary, then anything can happen. This is what Hume asserts in the most famous passage of his Enquiry: "The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality....
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