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Books Books 41 - 50 of 87 on Great queen, what you command me to relate, Renews the sad remembrance of our fate.....
" Great queen, what you command me to relate, Renews the sad remembrance of our fate. An empire from its old foundations rent, And... "
The German Museum, Or, Monthly Repository of the Literature of Germany, the ... - Page 15
1800
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The second book of Dryden's Ćneid of Virgil, with notes [&c.] ed. by W. McLeod

Publius Vergilius Maro - 1871
...Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a desert place; All that I saw, and part of which I was, Not even the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. 10 And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars to kindly rest invite. bench or steps.'...
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The Eclogues, Volume 1

1872
...the Trojans underwent ; A peopled city made a desert place ; All that I saw, a part of which I was ; Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. 10 And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars to kindly rest invite. But, since you...
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Poetical Quotations from Chaucer to Tennyson: With Copious Indexes ...

Quotations, English - 1875 - 772 pages
...with pleasing shades are crown'd, And sleeps are sweeter on the silken ground. DRYDEN. keep, SLEEP. Now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite. DRYDEN. Take you the reins, while I from cares remove And sleep within the chariot which I drove. DRYDEN....
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The Works of Virgil

Virgil - 1877 - 492 pages
...underwent ; A peopled city made a desert place ; All that I saw, and part of which I was; Not e'en the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses...stars, to kindly rest invite. But since you take such interest in our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly...
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Poetical Quotations from Chaucer to Tennyson: With Copious Indexes : Authors ...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1878 - 788 pages
...with pleasing shades are crown'd, And sleeps are sweeter on the silken ground. DRYDEN. keep, SLEEP. Now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite. DRYDF.N. Take you the reins, while I from cares remove And sleep within the chariot which I drove....
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The Works of Virgil

Virgil - Latin poetry - 1881 - 425 pages
...saw and part of which I was ; Not e'en the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses hear, without a tear. And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite. Bat, since you take such int'rest in our woe, • And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will...
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English Synonymes Explained: In Alphabetical Order ; with Copious ...

George Crabb - English language - 1882 - 856 pages
...callowi, it refers also to what he was, and from what he is become so. 497 HARD Snch woes Not e'en the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. DRYDEN. By decrees the sense grows ciillott*, anil loses that exquisite relish of trifles. HEIIKEUET....
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The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it is with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptoms ...

Robert Burton - Melancholy - 1883 - 747 pages
...fere отлез aut evtr&as, aut sob juquatas, aut In rudera fœdissimč dcjecus. Oerbdius. * Not even the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. other maintenance, especially those within the land. ' Mecca in Arabia Petrcca, stands in a most unfruitful...
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English Synonymes Explained: In Alphabetical Order ; with Copious ...

George Crabb - English language - 1883 - 856 pages
...refers also to what he was, and from what he is become so. 497 HARD Such woes Not e'en the harafKt of our foes could hear, N'or stern Ulysses tell without a tear. DKYDEN. liy degrees the sense prows calluu», anil loses tliat exquisite relish of trines. I ; u;i....
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Ćneid

Aeneas (Legendary character) - 1884 - 319 pages
...Trojans underwent: A peopled city made a desert place; All that I saw, and part of which I was : Not even the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses...stars to kindly rest invite. But since you take such interest in our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly...
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