Thus Spake Zarathustra

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Jan 5, 1999 - Literary Collections - 270 pages
22 Reviews
A 19th-century literary masterpiece, tremendously influential in the arts and in philosophy, uses the Persian religious leader Zarathustra to voice the author’s views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the ▄bermensch, or "superman," a term later perverted by Nazi propagandists. A passionate, quasi-biblical style is employed to inspire readers to become more than they have been and to transcend the limitations of conventional morality. A provocative work that remains a fixture of college reading lists.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - guhlitz - LibraryThing

Reminded me of the Koran. Short, Sweet and Authoritarian. Nietzsche being Nietzsche nonetheless, very difficult not to appreciate the satirical, nihilistic effect of the big metaphorical picture. Read full review

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User Review  - tungsten_peerts - LibraryThing

I can never make up my mind about Nietzsche. Is he a genius or a nitwit? Is he even, in the end, anything that can reasonably be called a "philosopher"? My personal answer to the first question is (as ... Read full review

Contents

ZARATHUSTRAS PROLOGUE
1
FIRST PART The Three Metamorphoses
13
The Academic Chairs of Virtue
14
Backworldsmen
16
The Despisers of the Body
19
Joys and Passions
20
The Pale Criminal
22
Reading and Writing
23
Redemption
93
Manly Prudence
97
The Stillest Hour
99
THIRD PART XLV The Wanderer
103
The Vision and the Enigma
106
Involuntary Bliss
110
Before Sunrise 12
112
The Bedwarfing Virtue
115

The Tree on the Hill
25
The Preachers of Death
27
War and Warriors
28
The New Idol
29
The Flies in the Marketplace
31
Chastity
34
The Friend
35
The Thousand and One Goals
36
NeighbourLove
38
The Way of the Creating One
39
Old and Young Women
41
The Bite of the Adder
43
Child and Marriage
44
Voluntary Death
46
The Bestowing Virtue
48
SECOND PART XXIII The Child with the Mirror
53
In the Happy Isles
55
The Pitiful
57
The Priests
59
The Virtuous
61
The Rabble
63
The Tarantulas
65
The Famous Wise Ones
68
The NightSong
70
The DanceSong
71
The GraveSong
73
SelfSurpassing
76
The Sublime Ones
78
The Land of Culture
80
Immaculate Perception
82
Scholars
84
Poets
86
Great Events
89
The Soothsayer
91
On the OliveMount
119
On Passingby
121
The Apostates
124
The Return Home
127
The Three Evil Things
130
The Spirit of Gravity
133
Old and New Tables
136
The Convalescent
152
The Great Longing
156
The Second Dance Song
159
The Seven Seals
162
FOURTH AND LAST PART LXI The Honey Sacrifice
166
The Cry of Distress
169
Talk with the Kings
172
The Leech
175
The Magician
177
Out of Service
183
The Ugliest Man
186
The Voluntary Beggar
190
The Shadow
193
Noontide
195
The Greeting
198
The Supper
202
The Higher Man
203
The Song of Melancholy
212
Science
215
Among Daughters of the Desert
218
The Awakening
222
The AssFestival
225
The Drunken Song
228
The Sign
234
Notes on Thus Spake Zarathustra by Anthony M Ludovici
237
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About the author (1999)

The son of a Lutheran pastor, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was born in 1844 in Roecken, Prussia, and studied classical philology at the Universities of Bonn and Leipzig. While at Leipzig he read the works of Schopenhauer, which greatly impressed him. He also became a disciple of the composer Richard Wagner. At the very early age of 25, Nietzsche was appointed professor at the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 1870, during the Franco-Prussian War, Nietzsche served in the medical corps of the Prussian army. While treating soldiers he contracted diphtheria and dysentery; he was never physically healthy afterward. Nietzsche's first book, The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music (1872), was a radical reinterpretation of Greek art and culture from a Schopenhaurian and Wagnerian standpoint. By 1874 Nietzsche had to retire from his university post for reasons of health. He was diagnosed at this time with a serious nervous disorder. He lived the next 15 years on his small university pension, dividing his time between Italy and Switzerland and writing constantly. He is best known for the works he produced after 1880, especially The Gay Science (1882), Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-85), Beyond Good and Evil (1886), On the Genealogy of Morals (1887), The Antichrist (1888), and Twilight of the Idols (1888). In January 1889, Nietzsche suffered a sudden mental collapse; he lived the last 10 years of his life in a condition of insanity. After his death, his sister published many of his papers under the title The Will to Power. Nietzsche was a radical questioner who often wrote polemically with deliberate obscurity, intending to perplex, shock, and offend his readers. He attacked the entire metaphysical tradition in Western philosophy, especially Christianity and Christian morality, which he thought had reached its final and most decadent form in modern scientific humanism, with its ideals of liberalism and democracy. Nietzsche expounded a vitalistic metaphysics of the will to power, which he applied psychologically to undermine traditional conceptions of mind as well as moral, religious, and philosophical ideas. At the same time he attacked systematic thinking as a whole, maintaining the nihilistic view that there is no such thing as truth, but only an endless variety of equally false views of life held from variously interested perspectives. Although for a long time English-speaking academic philosophy tended to dismiss Nietzsche's philosophy as irresponsible (merely "literary"), it has become increasingly clear that his writings are among the deepest and most prescient sources we have for acquiring a philosophical understanding of the roots of twentieth-century culture.

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