The life of Benvenuto Cellini, written by himself, tr. by T. Nugent, Volume 1

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1828
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Page 161 - ... so covering his eyes with his hands, he again exclaimed, that destruction was inevitable, and he desired to see no more. The necromancer entreated me to have a good heart and take care to burn proper perfumes ; upon which, I turned to Romoli, and bid him burn all the most precious perfumes he had. At the same time I cast my eye upon Agnolino Gaddi, who was terrified to such a degree, that he could scarce distinguish objects, and seemed to be half dead. Seeing him in this condition, I said, "...
Page 9 - ... which you see in the fire is a Salamander ; such a one as never was beheld before, to my knowledge;" so saying he embraced me, and gave me some money.
Page 180 - I thereupon clapped my hand to a sharp dagger, and having forced my way through the file of ruffians, laid hold of him by the throat so quickly, and with such presence of mind, that there was not one of his friends could defend him. I pulled him towards me, to give him a blow in front, but he turned his face about through excess of terror, so that I wounded him...
Page 180 - ... defend him. I pulled him towards me, to give him a blow in front, but he turned his face about through excess of terror, so that I wounded him exactly under the ear; and upon repeating my blow, he fell down dead. It had never been my intention to kill him, but blows are not always under command.
Page 162 - ... As we were going to our houses, in the quarter of Banchi, the boy told us that two of the demons whom we had seen at the amphitheatre, went on before us leaping and skipping, sometimes running upon the roofs of the houses, and sometimes upon the ground. The priest declared, that though he had often entered magic circles, nothing so extraordinary had ever happened to him.
Page 277 - This year he fancied himself a bat, and when he went to take a walk, he sometimes made just such a noise as bats do ; he likewise used gestures with his hands and his body, as
Page 161 - The whole amphitheatre is burning, and the fire is just falling upon us ;" so covering his eyes with his hands, he again exclaimed, that destruction was inevitable, and he desired to see no more. The necromancer entreated me to have a good heart, and take care to burn proper perfumes ; upon which I turned to Romoli, and bid him burn all the most precious perfumes he had. At the same time I cast my eye upon Agnolino Gaddi, who was terrified to such a degree, that he could scarce distinguish objects,...
Page 162 - As we went along he would fain have persuaded me to assist with him at consecrating a book, from which he said we should derive immense riches : we should then ask the demons to discover to us the various treasures with which the earth abounds, which would raise us to opulence and power ; but that those love affairs were mere follies, from whence no good could be expected. I answered, " That I would have readily accepted his proposal, if I had understood Latin.
Page 160 - Romoli, who quivered like an aspen leaf, took care of the perfumes. Though I was as much terrified as any of them, I did my utmost to conceal the terror I felt, so that I greatly contributed to inspire the rest with resolution; but the truth is, I gave myself over for a dead man, seeing the horrid fright the necromancer was in. The boy placed his head between his knees, and said, " In this posture will I die; for we shall all surely perish.
Page 82 - I cautiously approached the walls, and perceived that there was an extraordinary confusion among the assailants, occasioned by our having shot the Duke of Bourbon : he was, as I understood afterwards, that chief personage whom I saw raised above the rest

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