The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, Volume 1

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C. Scribner's sons, 1895 - Edict of Nantes
 

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Page 203 - Therefore thus saith the LORD concerning the king of Assyria, He shall not come into this city, nor shoot an arrow there, nor come before it with shield, nor cast a bank against it.
Page 497 - ... reign ; how happy France had been now for fifty years, occasioned chiefly by the quiet it was in with relation to those matters. He gave him an account of their numbers, their industry and wealth, their constant readiness to advance the revenue, and that all the quiet he had with the court of Rome was chiefly owing to them : if they were rooted out, the court of Rome would govern as absolutely in France, as it did in Spain.
Page 274 - I have received your letter by Die Graeme ; this is my answer : — I command you to send all the French away to-morrow out of the town, if you can by fair means (but stick not long in disputing), otherwise force them away, driving them away like so many wild beasts until you have shipped them, and so the devil go with them.
Page 510 - Catholicks upon the French Protestants, who tremble for fear of some violent persecution, and are ready to go into England in such vast numbers as would be a great advantage to the nation, if you would by easy naturalization make it in the least easy to them. I find those who are rich are afraid our King should meddle with their concerns, but the crowd and the number talk of nothing but the necessity of his declaring himself Protectour of the whole Protestant religion, and live upon the hopes of...
Page 511 - Rj holds himself obliged in honour and conscience to comfort and support all such afflicted Protestants, who by reason of the rigours and severities which are used towards them, upon the account of their religion, shall be forced to quit their native country, and shall desire to shelter themselves under His Majesty's Royal Protection, for the preservation and free exercise of their religion...
Page 497 - He came well prepared. He told him what the state of France was during the wars in his father's reign ; how happy France had been now for fifty years, occasioned chiefly by the quiet it was in with relation to those matters. He gave him an account of their numbers, their industry and wealth, their constant readiness to advance...
Page 512 - Four other boats left with this, one of which is said to have put into Dartmouth, but it is not yet known what became of the other three.
Page 509 - Charenton one Sunday since I came into France. How much more that is for the King's service you cannot imagine, unless you saw how kindly those poor people take so small a countenancing as mine is...

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