The British Army, 1783-1802: Four Lectures Delivered at the Staff College and Cavalry School

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Macmillan, 1905 - Great Britain - 148 pages
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Page 152 - Proper words in proper places make the true definition of a style.
Page 122 - I cannot write to the General at present ; but tell him that I hope he is as much at ease on shore as I am on board.
Page 153 - Fortescue has been the first to construct a scholarly and connected story of the growth of our military institutions and of the development of tactics as revealed in a continuous series of wars. His style is lucid, and his description of battles are easy to follow. But his chief merit is a well-balanced judgment.
Page 154 - The Hon. JW Fortescue is greatly to be congratulated upon the third volume of his very important History of the British Army. . . . With the publication of this book the British Army is gaining a complete history really worthy of the name.
Page 118 - Martinique in less than three or four days against wind and current ; similarly the passage from Barbados to Martinique would occupy twenty-four hours, but the return voyage was bound to occupy a fortnight or three weeks at least, and might on occasion prove absolutely impossible. But the chief advantage lay on the side of the French, for. with the exception of Barbados, Martinique and St. Lucia are the most easterly of the whole chain, and they have good harbours whereas Barbados has none. The task...
Page 125 - The light infantry will take care of themselves," he said ; " as for you, stand fast." The light infantry did take care of themselves, for they had learned some useful lessons in America. Advancing in skirmishing order, and keeping themselves always under cover, they maintained at close range a most destructive fire upon the heavy French columns. If the French attempted to extend, they threatened a charge with the bayonet ; when the French closed up, they were themselves already extended and pouring...
Page 126 - Advancing in skirmishing order, and keeping themselves always under cover, they maintained at close range a most destructive fire upon the heavy French columns. If the French attempted to extend, they threatened a charge with the bayonet ; when the French closed up, they were themselves already extended and pouring in a galling fire ; when the French advanced with solidity and determination, they retired as if beaten and disappeared, but only to renew their fire, invisible themselves, from every...
Page 119 - ... whole of his unwieldy charge into Carlisle Bay at Barbados, and found, as he expected, a squadron lying there at anchor. Very beautiful the sight must have been as the huge fleet came sliding in over the clear, blue water, with the sails shining white under the tropical sun and the line of red coats round every ship's side. Very welcome too to the men must have been the view of the low hills, with their robe of green...
Page 123 - D'Estaing's fleet, while the defeat of the squadron would deprive the army of its supplies. Moreover the nature of the case had compelled Grant to divide his small force. Four battalions, under Sir Henry Calder, had been left to guard tho heights around Cul de Sac Bay to prevent attack upon the transports from the land, and to maintain communication with Morne Fortune.
Page 125 - ... beach and move up against the front and flank of the light infantry as if to cut them off. It was an awkward moment, for the General seemed to be in danger of being cut off also, and, in the absence of orders, many doubted whether the main body ought not to advance in order to rescue their comrades. But presently Medows came back perfectly cool and composed. " The light infantry will take care of themselves," he said ;

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