Conecuh People: Words of Life from the Alabama Black Belt

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NewSouth Books, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 244 pages
This volume is an intimate collection of oral history interviews that captures the lives of the people who were once the backbone of the rural South, in this case from Bullock County, Alabama. The interviews are elevated to art by the skill of the interviewer/author, a native, who left the area after high school and became a college professor and well-known author in Kentucky but always maintained his roots in the community where he grew up.
 

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Contents

The Riches of Home
3
The Birthday Lady
15
TavernKeeper and Moonshiner
27
Historian and Folk Artist
47
Storyteller
63
SCHOOL DAYS
74
Teacher
75
Local Historian
81
A Good Life of Hard Work
135
A Survivor
145
RECREATION
152
As Sturdy as the Oak
153
Woman of the Spirit
167
COMMUNITY LIFE
178
An Only Child
179
A Man of His Words
198

CHILDREN
90
Housewife and Surrogate Mother
91
An Independent Woman
101
Sardines Soda Water and Catfish in the Well
115
From Cotton Field to Cotton Mill
125
COMMUNITY LIFE
134
Up From Poverty
211
YOUTH
220
A Dutiful Life
221
STATUARY 1894
234
INDEX
236
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

WADE HALL (1934-2015) taught at colleges and universities in Florida and Kentucky, and was the author of many books, monographs, poems, and plays about the South and its people. He held degrees from Troy State University, the University of Alabama, and the University of Illinois. A native of rural Alabama, he lived and worked in Louisville, Kentucky, from 1962 to 2006, when he moved back to his family homeplace at Hall's Crossroads in Bullock County, Alabama, south of Union Springs, Alabama.

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