Ali Dubyiah and the Forty Thieves: A Contemporary Fable

Front Cover
NewSouth Books, 2006 - Fiction - 143 pages
Told from a vantage point of long ago and far away, Ali Dubyiah and the Forty Thieves reconstructs--from the recently discovered journals of Ibrahim Barzouni--the tale of the ruler George W. Dubyiah Fratbush, son of the earlier monarch Wimpbush, and the Fall of the American Empire. After Ali Dubyiah ascends to the kingship, his lust for power draws him into a gambit to take possession of the world, together with his band of thieves--including Dick Chaingang, Donald Rumsfailed, and Paul Werewolf. But how long can Ali Dubyiah lie, cheat, and steal before his subjects rise up against him?
 

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User Review  - paulrwaibel44 - LibraryThing

Ali Dubyiah and the Forty Thieves, a Parable of the Reign of George W. Fratbush Recently while attending the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association, I happened to stop by a booth ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
7
II
15
III
30
IV
46
V
68
VI
86
VII
109
VIII
122
IX
135
X
143
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - Do not veil the truth with falsehood, nor conceal the truth knowingly.
Page 5 - Know the truth and the truth shall set you free,

About the author (2006)

John Egerton was a "professional South-watcher" for over half a century. Beginning in high school in the 1950s, through two years in the U.S. Army, five years earning two college degrees, five more as a college news bureau reporter, six as a magazine writer, and for the past thirty-five years as an independent journalist and author, he seldom strayed far from his life's work: following the social and culture, political and economic trends that forever have made the American South the unique place that it is, for better and worse. Until the publication of Ali Dubyiah and the Forty Thieves , all his publishing writing, including more than fifteen books, had been classified as nonfiction. He called this book "a fable ... a parable ... a cautionary tale" in the genre of "political science-fiction," and he claims that he "did not so much author it as synthesize it from hundreds of sources, compile it, and become by default the one to present it to the reading public. Fables don't have authors. They're found, heard, passed down.

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