Trouble on the Tombigbee

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NewSouth, Incorporated, 2011 - Juvenile Fiction - 203 pages
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In Ted Dunagan's third young adult novel, boyhood friends Ted and Poudlum, a white boy and a black boy who live in the rural segregated South of the 1940s, find their fishing trip interrupted by a Ku Klux Klan meeting. The boys accidentally learn the identity of key Klansmen. Discovered, they escape down the river but only to swim into the arms of more trouble. Dunagan's storytelling gifts make this an engaging read. Ted and Poudlum's escapades test their resourcefulness and challenge their awakening moral selves, as they come to understand the injustice of the time in which they live. Being a kid was never better than when Ted Dunagan imagines it. And the imagining was never better than in Trouble on the Tombigbee, the author's latest work.

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TROUBLE ON THE TOMBIGBEE

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A follow-up to the well-loved A Yellow Watermelon (2007) and Secret of the Satilfa (2010); all three volumes follow Ted and Poudlum, a pair of fast friends who happen to be of different races as they ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Ted M. Dunagan was born and grew up in rural southwestern Alabama. He served in the U.S. Army, attended Georgia State University, and retired from a career in business in 2003. He received the 2009 Georgia Author of the Year Award in Young Adult Fiction for his debut novel, A Yellow Watermelon. The book was also named to the inaugural list of "The 25 Books All Young Georgians Should Read" compiled by the Georgia Center for the Book, and selected as an Accelerated Reader Title. He followed his first success with a sequel, Secret of the Satilfa, which earned the 2011 Georgia Author of the Year Award, followed by his third in the series, Trouble on the Tombigbee, which won the 2012 Georgia Author of the Year Award, and the 2013 Yerby Award for Fiction. He lives in Monticello, Georgia, where he writes news, features, and a weekly column for The Monticello News.

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