Meeting Myself 'round the Corner: Poems

Front Cover
NewSouth Books, Jan 1, 2009 - Poetry - 176 pages
In her second collection of poems, Carol Prejean Zippert continues to explore the intersecting worlds she inhabits as a woman, a wife and mother, an educator, an African American, a Southerner, a community activist, and a writer. Zippert has a rich, musical voice in her poetry, and she is never afraid of her emotions. She lets her readers share her joys as well as her sorrows, her curiosity as well as her certainty. "I wish I could tell you my fears," she writes, "but the trouble is all in my mind." It's to her credit that she so effortlessly invites us inside this creative mind, which draws insights from topics ranging from the mundane acts of daily life (brewing coffee, raking the yard) to the broad sweep of history (the legacy of Malcolm X, the promised-but-not-delivered forty acres and a mule), to the many faces and expressions of love and faith. When she writes, "Is she that gift to me, coming into / my home, reminding that the greatest / treasures of our world are still found / in the simplest acts of love?," Zippert is speaking of the bird that has built a nest in her garage, but she might also be describing these poems she has carefully constructed and delivered to her readers.
 

Contents

Remember When I Wrote Poetry
13
Funerals Are for the Living
20
Our Fathers Day
26
The Nuns
32
Crazy Rose
39
Weve Been Away So Long
45
Invoking Malcolms Legacy
51
Garbage Men
59
The Silence of Love
108
Need You To Miss Me
114
Speechless
121
Banning the Black List
128
Give Me a Break
134
Heavens Song
140
Litany for the Child
147
Broken Wing
153

WISH I COULD TELL YOU MY FEARS
63
Dream Community
82
The Day I Was Free
88
Short Thoughts
94
Dust Under the Rug
159
Growing Old with Mother In Memory
165
The Birds Nest
171
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

CAROL PREJEAN ZIPPERT, a Louisiana native, is a poet, educator, community activist, and newspaper publisher in the Black Belt region of west Alabama, where she has lived with her family since 1971. Her earlier collection of poetry, I Don't Want To Be Rich, Just Able, is also published by NewSouth Books. Dr. Zippert has a special interest in rural youth and serves as an adjunct research professor and resource specialist for Tuskegee University's Community-Based Youth Partnerships. She has also helped orchestrate institutions such as the Greene County Employees Federal Credit Union, 21st Century Youth Leadership Movement, the Society of Folk Arts & Culture, and the Black Belt Community Foundation. With her husband, John, she owns and co-publishes the Greene County Democrat, the county newspaper of record in Eutaw, Alabama. The Zipperts have two daughters, one son, and a growing number of grandchildren.

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