Lake Peipus 1242: Battle of the ice

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Bloomsbury USA, Mar 15, 1997 - History - 96 pages
Osprey's Campaign title for The battle of Lake Peipus, which took place in 1242 between the Teutonic Knights and the Russian city-state of Novgorod, led by its inspirational leader Alexandre Nevskii. The Teutonic Knights were a powerful military order, backed with the crusading zeal of Europe, the blessing of the Pope and the support of the Holy Roman Emperor. This battle, although little-known in the west, was important in the history of the medieval eastern crusades, the Teutonic defeat having a serious effect on future events. David Nicolle's excellent text examines the Crusade against Novgorod and the fierce fighting around the frozen shores of Lake Peipus.

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User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

These Osprey Campaign books are quite useful to those with a hobbiest, rather than professional interest in Military History. The Baltic was a seriously political sea during the time period covered by ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

A book containing the usual birdseye views of the battle field. There is some discussion of the arrow-in-the-eye theory, and good maps of the campaigning after Hastings. The section on War-gaming Hastings is an interesting essay on the idea of refighting battles. Read full review

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About the author (1997)

David Nicolle was born in 1944, the son of the illustrator Pat Nicolle. He worked in the BBC Arabic service for a number of years, before going 'back to school', gaining an MA from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and a doctorate from Edinburgh University. He later taught world and Islamic art and architectural history at Yarmuk University, Jordan. He has written many books and articles on medieval and Islamic warfare, and has been a prolific author of Osprey titles for many years. David lives and works in Leicestershire, UK.

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