The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Race in American History

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Kathryn Gin Lum, Paul Harvey
Oxford University Press, 2018 - History - 624 pages
The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Race in American History brings together a number of established scholars, as well as younger scholars on the rise, to provide a scholarly overview for those interested in the role of religion and race in American history. Thirty-four scholars from the fields of History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, and more investigate the complex interdependencies of religion and race from pre-Columbian origins to the present. The volume addresses the religious experience, social realities, theologies, and sociologies of racialized groups in American religious history, as well as the ways that religious myths, institutions, and practices contributed to their racialization.

Part One begins with a broad introductory survey outlining some of the major terms and explaining the intersections of race and religions in various traditions and cultures across time. Part Two provides chronologically arranged accounts of specific historical periods that follow a narrative of religion and race through four-plus centuries. Taken together, The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Race in American History provides a reliable scholarly text and resource to summarize and guide work in this subject, and to help make sense of contemporary issues and dilemmas.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Theoretical and Topical Overviews
21
Religious Traditions and Popular Culture
139
From The Colonies to The Present
319
Immigration Pluralism and Civil Rights
437
Index
597
Copyright

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About the author (2018)


Paul Harvey is a Professor of History and Presidential Teaching Scholar at the University of Colorado.

Kathryn Gin Lum is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies in collaboration with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University.

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