Handbook of Brain Microcircuits

Front Cover
Gordon M. Shepherd, Sten Grillner
Oxford University Press, Dec 29, 2017 - Brain - 599 pages
Updated and revised, the second edition of Handbook of Brain Microcircuits covers the functional organization of 50 brain regions. This now-classic text uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the integration of structure, function, electrophysiology, pharmacology, brain imaging, and behavior. Through uniquely concise and authoritative chapters by leaders in their fields, the Handbook of Brain Microcircuits synthesizes many of the new principles of microcircuit organization that are defining a new era in understanding the brain connectome, integrating the major neuronal pathways and essential microcircuits with brain function.

New to the Second Edition:
- Insights into new regions of the brain through canonical microcircuit diagrams for each region
- Latest methodology in optogenetics, neurotransmitter uncaging, computational models of neurons and microcircuits, serial ultrastructure reconstructions, cellular and regional imaging
- Extrapolated data from new genetic tools and understandings applied to microcircuits in the mouse and Drosophila
- Common principles across vertebrate and invertebrate microcircuit systems, one of the key goals of modern neuroscience

 

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Contents

Thalamus
85
Circadian System
109
Basal Ganglia
119
Limbic System and Memory
151
Visual System
263
Olfactory System
307
Taste System
377
Auditory System
401
Cerebellum
437
Motor Systems
455
Index
581
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About the author (2017)


Gordon M. Shepherd received his BS at Iowa State College in 1955, MD at Harvard in 1959, and DPhil at Oxford in 1962. After postdoctoral training at NIH, MIT and the Karolinska Institute he joined the faculty at Yale Medical School, where he is Professor of Neuroscience.

Sten Grillner studied at the medical faculty in Gothenburg, Sweden, and received his MD, PhD in neurophysiology in 1969. He has been a Professor and Director of the Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology at the Karolinska Institute since 1987.

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