Baloh and Honrubia's Clinical Neurophysiology of the Vestibular System

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This book provides a framework for understanding the pathophysiology of diseases involving the vestibular system. The book is divided into four parts: I. Anatomy and physiology of the vestibular system; II. Evaluation of the dizzy patient; III. Diagnosis and management of common neurotologic disorders; and IV. Symptomatic treatment of vertigo. Part I reviews the anatomy and physiology of the vestibular system with emphasis on clinically relevant material. Part II outlines the important features in the patient's history, examination, and laboratory evaluation that determine the probable site of lesion. Part III covers the differential diagnostic points that help the clinician decide on the cause and treatment of the patient's problem. Part IV describes the commonly used antivertiginous and antiemetic drugs and the rationale for vestibular exercises. The recent breakthroughs in the vestibular sciences are reviewed. This book will helpful to all physician's who study and treat patients complaining of dizziness.
 

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Contents

PART 2 EVALUATION OF THE DIZZY PATIENT
119
PART 3 DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF COMMON NEUROTOLOGIC DISORDERS
231
PART 4 SYMPTOMATIC TREATMENT OF VERTIGO
403
VIDEO LEGENDS
433
INDEX
435
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About the author (2010)


Robert W. Baloh, MD, FAAN is Director of the Neuro-Ontology program in the Department of Neurology at the Reed Neurological Institute, University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, CA.

Kevin A. Kerber, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Michigan Health Systems. Dr. Kerber joined the UM faculty in 2005, and currently directs the Department of Neurology Dizziness Clinic. Dr. Kerber's research and clinical interests center on the presentation of dizziness, which include a number of disorders that typically involve the cerebellum, brain stem, or peripheral vestibular structures. His previous research with Dr. Baloh led to important discoveries about balance disorders in the elderly, inherited and sporadic ataxia syndromes, and oculomotor physiology. Dr. Kerber's current research focus is using health services research approaches to optimize patient care and health care utilization for dizziness presentations. His work is supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) K23 research grant (K23RR024009) and an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) R18 research grant (R18HS017690).

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