The Time Machine

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2017 - Fiction - 119 pages
At a Victorian dinner party in Richmond, London, the Time Traveler returns to tell his extraordinary tale of mankind's future in the year 802,701 AD. It is a dystopian vision of Darwinian evolution, with humans split into an above-ground species of Eloi, and their troglodyte brothers.

The first book H. G. Wells published, The Time Machine is a scientific romance that helped invent the genre of science fiction and the time travel story. Even before its serialization had finished in the spring of 1895, Wells had been declared "a man of genius," and the book heralded a fifty year career of a major cultural and political controversialist. It is a sardonic rejection of Victorian ideals of progress and improvement and a detailed satirical commentary on the Decadent culture of the 1890's.

This edition features a contextual introduction, detailed explanatory notes, and two essays Wells wrote just prior to the publication of his first book.

 

Contents

Introduction
7
The Machine
12
The Time Traveller Returns
16
Time Travelling
21
In The Golden Age
26
The Sunset of Mankind
30
A Sudden Shock
35
Explanation
40
After The Story
83
Epilogue
87
The New Review The Further Vision
89
HG Wells Zoological Retrogression 1891
92
H G Wells On Extinction 1893
100
Explanatory Notes
103
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
120
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
121

The Morlocks
50
When The Night Came
55
The Palace of Green Porcelain
61
In The Darkness
67
The Trap of the White Sphinx
73
The Further Vision
76
The Time Travellers Return
81
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
122
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
123
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
124
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
125
OXFORD WORLDS CLASSICS
126
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About the author (2017)

H. G. Wells was born in Bromley, England on September 21, 1866. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a draper, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology. He graduated from London University in 1888 and became a science teacher. He also wrote for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. He became an author best known for science fiction novels and comic novels. His science fiction novels include The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Wonderful Visit, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon, and The Food of the Gods. His comic novels include Love and Mr. Lewisham, Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul, The History of Mr. Polly, and Tono-Bungay. He also wrote several short story collections including The Stolen Bacillus, The Plattner Story, and Tales of Space and Time. He died on August 13, 1946 at the age of 79.