Manual of Childhood Infection: The Blue Book

Front Cover
Mike Sharland
Oxford University Press, 2016 - Infection in children - 990 pages
Infectious diseases remain a leading cause of child morbidity and mortality worldwide. Now in its fourth edition, Manual of Childhood Infections is a simple-to-use, evidence-based, and practical handbook on how to recognize, investigate, and manage both common and rare infectious diseases in children and babies. Endorsed by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases, this fully updated version of the established 'Blue Book' complements the Pan European initiatives and UK diploma courses to harmonise patient management and training in Paediatric Infectious Diseases (PID), making it essential reading for UK and European paediatricians.
Manual of Childhood Infections is divided into two alphabetized sections for easy access to information, covering key diagnosis and management features of infections alongside crucial points of epidemiology and clinical features. This fourth edition forms practical reading for practising paediatricians, featuring updates to all key chapters based on a literature review alongside new chapters focusing on emerging problems for Europe.
 

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Contents

1 Antibacterials
3
2 Antifungals
11
3 Antiparasitics
23
4 Antivirals
31
5 Antimicrobial stewardship
43
6 Bacterial meningitis
49
7 Bone and joint infections
65
8 Cardiac infections
70
67 Gonococcal infection
541
68 Haemolyticuraemic syndrome
545
69 Haemophilus influenzae
554
70 Viral haemorrhagic fevers
560
71 Hand foot and mouth disease
568
72 Helicobacter pylori
572
73 Hepatitis A and E
576
74 Hepatitis B
582

9 Central venous catheter infections
93
10 Chronic fatigue syndrome
100
11 Congenital infections
103
12 Diarrhoea and vomiting
112
13 Emerging infections and pandemic preparedness
117
14 Encephalitis
125
15 Enlarged lymph nodes
135
16 Ocular infections
148
17 Immunocompromised children with infection
160
18 Immunization of the immunocompromised child
171
19 Infection control in the community
183
20 Infection control in the hospital
188
21 Laboratory diagnosis of infection
199
22 Lower respiratory tract infection
210
23 Neonatal infections
220
24 Hereditary autoinflammatory diseases
228
25 Pyrexia of unknown origin
234
26 Rash
242
27 Grampositive bacteria
257
28 Gramnegative infections
263
29 Refugees and internationally adopted children
269
30 The unwell child returning from abroad
274
31 Sepsis syndrome
281
32 Sexually transmitted infections
293
33 Skin and soft tissue infections
300
34 Investigating the child with possible immunodeficiency
309
35 Invasive fungal infection
326
36 Toxic shock syndrome
334
37 Trauma bites and burns
344
38 Travelling abroad with children
350
39 Urinary tract infection
357
40 Upper respiratory tract infections
366
41 Zoonoses
377
Section 2 Specific infections
385
42 Adenovirus
389
43 Amoebiasis
396
44 Anaerobic infections
402
45 Arboviruses
411
46 Ascariasis
420
47 Aspergillosis
429
48 Botulism
442
49 Brucellosis
446
50 Campylobacter
450
51 Candidiasis
454
52 Cat scratch disease
461
53 Chickenpoxvaricellazoster
464
54 Chlamydia pneumoniae infection
474
55 Chlamydia psittaci infection
477
56 Chlamydia trachomatis infection
479
57 Cholera
484
58 Clostridium difficile
488
59 Conjunctivitis
497
60 Cryptosporidiosis
504
61 Cytomegalovirus
507
tinea capitis corporis pedis and unguium
513
63 Diphtheria
520
64 Enteroviruses including rhinoviruses and parechoviruses
524
65 Rhinovirus
533
66 Giardiasis
537
75 Hepatitis C
589
76 Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2
594
77 Human immunodeficiency virus infection
602
78 Helminthiases
613
79 EpsteinBarr virus
624
80 Influenza and parainfluenza
628
81 Threadworms
633
82 Kawasaki disease
637
83 Legionella
643
84 Leishmaniasis
648
85 Listeriosis
655
86 Lyme disease
659
87 Malaria
662
88 Measles
671
89 Meningococcal disease
676
90 Mumps
684
91 Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection
689
92 Mycoplasma infections
696
93 Head lice pediculosis
704
94 Norovirus
709
95 Other fungal infections
715
96 Human papillomavirus
723
97 Parvovirus
730
98 Pertussis
737
99 Plague
745
100 Pneumococcal disease
750
101 Pneumocystis pneumonia
757
102 Polio
764
103 Molluscum contagiosum and other poxviruses
769
104 Prion diseases
773
105 Rabies
780
106 Respiratory syncytial virus
785
107 Human herpesvirus 6 and 7
790
108Rotavirus
795
109 Rubella
799
110 Salmonellosis
804
111 Scabies
810
112 Schistosomiasis
814
113 Shigellosis
819
114 Staphylococcal infections including meticillin INNresistant Staphylococcus aureus
823
115 Streptococcal infections
832
116 Syphilis
840
117 Tetanus
846
118 Tickborne encephalitis
851
119 Toxocariasis
856
120 Toxoplasmosis
859
121 Tuberculosis
864
122 Typhoid and paratyphoidenteric fever
871
123 Typhus
877
124 Yellow fever
885
125 Yersiniosis
890
126 Kingella kingae
894
Appendix 1 Morbidity and mortality from infection
901
Appendix 2 Guidance on infection control in school and other childcare settings
908
Appendix 3 Variation in immunization schedules in Europe
913
Appendix 4 Blue book antimicrobial dosing guide
922
Index
967
Color Plate
991
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About the author (2016)


Mike Sharland is a Consultant at the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit at St George's Hospital, London He is a recognized expert in optimising antimicrobial use in children. He is a board member of ESPID, Chair of ESPID Research Committee, Previous Chair of ESPID Training Committee, and Chair of RCPCH Standing Committee on Infection and Immunisation and Chair of the UK Medicines for Children Research Network Allergy, Infection and Immunity Clinical Study Group. He is also the Joint Chair of the Pediatric European Network for Trials in Infection.

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