Understanding Deviance: A Guide to the Sociology of Crime and Rule-breaking

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Oxford University Press, 2016 - Crime - 406 pages
In Understanding Deviance, Seventh Edition, leading experts David Downes, Paul Rock, and Eugene McLaughlin examine the major sociological theories behind crime and deviance, covering their development, recent research, and varying perspectives on their explanations of criminality. The authors discuss key debates in depth, challenging students to question assumptions and explore new avenues of scholarship. An extensive bibliography provides references to a wide range of both classic and lesser-known texts.
 

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Contents

The Changing Nature And Scope Of The Sociology Of Crime And Deviance
1
2 Sources of Knowledge about Crime and Deviance
21
3 The Chicago School
46
The Durkheimian Legacy
70
5 Anomie And Strain Theory
89
6 Culture and Subculture
123
7 Symbolic Interactionism
160
8 Phenomenology
184
10 Radical Criminology
238
11 Feminist Criminology
267
12 Victimology
287
Theory and Policy
305
14 The Metamorphosis Of The Sociology Of Crime And Deviance
334
Bibliography
351
Index
395
Copyright

9 Control Theories
204

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About the author (2016)

David Downes is Emeritus Professor of Social Administration and a member of the Mannheim Centre of Criminology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is currently working with Tim Newburn and Paul Rock on the official history of criminal justice policy in England and Wales 1959-1997.Paul Rock is Emeritus Professor of Sociology and a member of the Mannheim Centre of Criminology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is currently working with David Downes and Tim Newburn on the official history of criminal justice policy in England and Wales 1959-1997.Eugene McLaughlin is Professor of Criminology and a member of the Department of Sociology at the City University of London. He is currently researching the significance of institutional scandals in the UK.

Bibliographic information