Oxford Handbook of Political Behavior

Front Cover
Russell J. Dalton, Research Professor of Political Science Russell J Dalton, Hans-Dieter Klingemann, Director of the Research Unit Institutions and Social Change Hans-Dieter Klingemann
Oxford University Press, 2007 - Political Science - 992 pages
1 Review
The Oxford Handbooks of Political Science is a ten-volume set of reference books offering authoritative and engaging critical overviews of the state of political science. Each volume focuses on a particular part of the discipline, with volumes on Public Policy, Political Theory, Political Economy, Contextual Political Analysis, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Law and Politics, Political Behavior, Political Institutions, and Political Methodology. The project as a whole is under the General Editorship of Robert E. Goodin, with each volume being edited by a distinguished international group of specialists in their respective fields. The books set out not just to report on the discipline, but to shape it. The series will be an indispensable point of reference for anyone working in political science and adjacent disciplines.

What does democracy expect of its citizens, and how do the citizenry match these expectations? This Oxford Handbook examines the role of the citizen in contemporary politics, based on essays from the world's leading scholars of political behavior research. The recent expansion of democracy has both given new rights and created new responsibilities for the citizenry. These political changes are paralleled by tremendous advances in our empirical knowledge of citizens and their behaviors through the institutionalization of systematic, comparative study of contemporary publics--ranging from the advanced industrial democracies to the emerging democracies of Central and Eastern Europe, to new survey research on the developing world. These essays describe how citizens think about politics, how their values shape their behavior, the patterns of participation, the sources of vote choice, and how public opinion impacts on governing and public policy.

This is the most comprehensive review of the cross-national literature of citizen behavior and the relationship between citizens and their governments. It will become the first point of reference for scholars and students interested in these key issues.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

P45-61

Contents

MASS BELIEF SYSTEMS AND COMMUNICATION
27
MODERNIZATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE
159
POLITICAL VALUES
303
NEW DEBATES IN POLITICAL BEHAVIOR
435
POLITICAL PARTICIPATION
619
DOES PUBLIC OPINION MATTER?
797
THE METHODOLOGY OF COMPARATIVE POLITICAL BEHAVIOR RESEARCH
863
Index
929
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Russell J. Dalton is Professor in the Center for the Study of Democracy at the University of California, Irvine. He has been a Fulbright Professor at the University of Mannheim, a German Marshall Research Fellow and a POSCO Fellow at the East/West Center. His scholarly interests includecomparative political behavior, political parties, social movements, and empirical democratic theory. Hans-Dieter Klingemann earned his academic degrees from the University of Cologne (1966: Dr. rer. pol.) and from the University of Mannheim (1978: Dr. habil.). He has held academic positions atthe University of Cologne (1966-74), the Center for Survey Research (ZUMA), Mannheim (1974-80), the Free University of Berlin (1980-2002), the Collegium Civitas, Warsaw (2001-2005), and the Social Science Research Center Berlin (1989-2003). Publications comprise numerous books and well above ahundred journal articles or book chapters (author or co-author).