Pudd'nhead Wilson and Other Tales

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OUP Oxford, Feb 26, 2009 - Fiction - 320 pages
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Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894), written in a more sombre vein than his other Mississippi writings, was Mark Twain's last serious work of fiction. It reveals the sinister forces that, towards the end of his life, Twain thought to be threatening the American dream. The central plot revolves around the tragedy of "Roxy," a mulatto slave whose attempt to save her son from his fate succeeds only in destroying him. An astringent work which raises the serious issue of racial difference, Pudd'nhead Wilson is considered by the critic F.R. Leavis to be "a classic of the use of popular modes--the sensational and the melodramatic." The volume also includes two other late works by Twain, Those Extraordinary Twins and The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg.

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Contents

THOSE EXTRAORDINARY TWINS
147
THE MAN THAT CORRUPTED HADLEYBURG
211
Explanatory Notes
264
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. Twain is most noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn , which has since been called the Great American Novel and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

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