Oxford Guide to Surviving as a CBT Therapist

Front Cover
Martina Mueller
Oxford University Press, 2010 - Psychology - 488 pages
For the newly trained Cognitive Behavioural Therapist, there are a wealth of challenges and difficulties faced, as they try and apply their new found skills in the outside world. These might include the stresses of working in isolation, and finding it difficult to widen their scope or bounce ideas of other CBT therapists; or the need for practical advice on setting up group therapy; the possible conflicts betweens ethical practice and theory; how to retain ones integrity as a therapist, while maintaing a viable business practice; dealing with diverse communities, or becoming a supervisor.

The Oxford Guide to Surviving CBT Practice is the one-stop resource for the newly trained therapist. It offers practical guidance on a range of issues and challenges faced by the therapist. Written by people with vast experience of training and practising CBT, it draws on real life situations to help the reader hone and develop their skills, adjust to life as a therapist, and maintain a successful and satisfying career whilst helping others.

With thousands of new CBT therapists being trained over the coming years, this book will be a constant companion for all those starting life as a therapist, one they will want to have to hand at all times.
 

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Contents

1 Common problems in therapy
1
working with South Asian Muslims
41
3 Looking after yourself
57
4 Ethics
83
5 Patient perspectives on receiving CBT
99
6 Lowintensity CBT
123
7 Brief CBT in GP surgeries and community settings
141
8 CBT in groups
157
12 CBT with inpatients in mental health settings
233
13 Physical health settings
253
working in private practice
275
15 Developing and progressing as a CBT therapist
301
16 Becoming a supervisor
323
17 Training skills
371
18 Research and evaluation
407
19 Service development
433

9 Systemic aspects of CBT
177
10 Doing CBT through others
199
11 Working in multidisciplinary teams
215
what can CBT do for us?
457
Index
481
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Martina Mueller and Helen Kennerley are Consultant Clinical Psychologists at the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre and Psychological Services at Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust in Oxford, UK. Freda McManus is Clinical Research Fellow in the Department ofPsychiatry a the University of Oxford, and Course Director, Oxford Diploma in Cognitive Therapy, Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre at Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. David Westbrook is Director of Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre at Oxfordshire andBuckinghamshire Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.

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