The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution

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Edward G. Gray, Jane Kamensky
OUP USA, Jan 10, 2013 - History - 673 pages
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The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution introduces scholars, students and generally interested readers to the formative event in American history. In thirty-three individual essays, by thirty-three authorities on the Revolution, the Handbook provides readers with in-depth analysis of the Revolution's many sides, ranging from the military and diplomatic to the social and political; from the economic and financial, to the cultural and legal. Its cast of characters ranges far, including ordinary farmers and artisans, men and women, free and enslaved African Americans, Indians, and British and American statesmen and military leaders. Its geographic scope is equally broad. The Handbook offers readers an American Revolution whose geo-political and military impact ranged from the West Indies to the Mississippi Valley; from the British Isles to New England and from Nova Scotia to Florida. The American Revolution of the Handbook is, simply put, an event that far transcended the boundaries of what was to become the United States. In addition to a breadth of subject matter, the Handbook offers a broad range of interpretive and methodological approaches. Its authors include social historians, historians of politics and institutions, cultural historians, historians of diplomacy, imperial historians, ethnohistorians, and historians of gender and sexuality. Instead of privileging a single or even several interpretive perspectives, the Handbook attempts to capture the full scope of current revolutionary-era scholarship. Nothing comparable has been published in decades.
 

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Contents

American Revolutions
1
PART I CULTURES AND CRISES
13
PART II WAR
159
PART III A REVOLUTIONARY SETTLEMENT
353
PART IV NEW ORDERS
481
Index
633
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About the author (2013)


Edward G. Gray is professor of history at Florida State University. His previous books include The Making of John Ledyard: Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler and New World Babel: Languages and Nations in Early America.
Jane Kamensky is Professor of History and Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University. Her previous books include The Exchange Artist: A Tale of High-Flying Speculation and America's First Banking Collapse and Governing the Tongue: The Politics of Speech in Early New England.