The Oxford Companion to American Politics, Volume 2

Front Cover
OUP USA, Jul 12, 2012 - Political Science - 1056 pages
0 Reviews
The two-volume Oxford Companion to American Politics is the first reference work to provide detailed, in-depth coverage of all aspects of American Politics. Top scholars of American Politics have written entries that surpass all previous reference material on the subject and provide scholars and students with ready access to sophisticated, comprehensive material. Long entries form the core of the book, covering such topics as climate change, terrorism, welfare policies, nuclear proliferation, voting behavior, and think tanks. Each of these entries include high-level scrutiny of the literature, history and future of the topic. The Companion also includes a number of entries from the 2001 Oxford Companion to Politics of the World, revised as necessary to bring coverage of such topics as foreign aid, and nuclear weapons up to date. In the current context of political gridlock, international tension, economic underperformance and social division, students of American politics need to focus on more than the inner workings of their own political institutions, important as that focus is. They also need to approach their work with as wide an understanding of our contemporary international and domestic economic, social and cultural conditions as it is possible for them quickly and easily to acquire. The Oxford Companion to American Politics has been designed precisely to meet the full range of those needs.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Topical Outline of Entries
449
Directory of Contributors
453

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)


David Coates is the Worrell Professor of Anglo-American Studies at Wake Forest University. His publications include A Liberal Tool Kit: Progressive Answers to Conservative Arguments (Praeger 2007) and several sets of works on contemporary political economy and labor politics.