Nuclear Medicine: Practical Physics, Artifacts, and Pitfalls

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2014 - Medical - 186 pages
In contrast to most anatomic radiographic imaging techniques, nuclear medicine permits real time, non-invasive imaging of human physiology and pathophysiology and also allows for exquisite targeting of disease with therapeutic radiology. To open this window to the processes of human disease,one must first understand the physical processes behind radioactive decay and emission, as well the principles of radiation detection. Practical Nuclear Medicine Physics provides residents and practitioners in nuclear medicine and radiology a readable explanation of the physics concepts underpinningnuclear imaging and how they impact the utilization and interpretation of those images.Following a brief introductory section, the book provides numerous case examples, illustrating various imaging artifacts and pitfalls that can be recognized and remedied with a solid understanding of the physics behind the procedure. Understanding and applying the physics behind nuclear medicine isessential to maximizing not only diagnostic and therapeutic accuracy for providing optimal patient care, but "Practical Physics" is a required portion of radiology residency education and a designated area of the board exams.
 

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Contents

2 Radiation
5
3 Radiobiology
15
4 Radiation DetectorsIonization Detectors
23
5 Radiation DetectorsSingle Photon
31
6 Radiation DetectionPet
55
7 Ionization ChamberDose Calibrator Artifacts
67
8 Gamma Camera Artifacts
73
9 Planar Acquisition Artifacts
83
11 Pet Acquisition Artifacts
109
12 Dose Calibrator Pitfalls
123
13 Single Photon Pitfalls
129
14 Pet Pitfalls
145
15 Therapy Pitfalls
157
16 Puzzlers
167
Index
181
Copyright

10 Spect Acquisition Artifacts
95

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About the author (2014)

Daniel a. Pryma is Assistant Professor of Radiology; Modality Chief, Nuclear Medicine/Molecular Imaging at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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