The Oxford Handbook of Social Psychology and Social Justice

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Phillip L. Hammack
Oxford University Press, 2018 - Psychology - 480 pages
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The twentieth century witnessed not only the devastation of war, conflict, and injustice on a massive scale, but it also saw the emergence of social psychology as a discipline committed to addressing these and other social problems. In the 21st century, however, the promise of social psychology remains incomplete. We have witnessed the reprise of authoritarianism and the endurance of institutionalized forms of oppression such as sexism, racism, and heterosexism across the globe.

Edited by Phillip L. Hammack, The Oxford Handbook of Social Psychology and Social Justice reorients social psychology toward the study of social injustice in real-world settings. The volume's contributing authors effectively span the borders between cultures and disciplines to better highlight new and emerging critical paradigms that interrogate the very real consequences of social injustice.

United in their belief in the possibility of liberation from oppression, with this Handbook, Hammack and his contributors offer a stirring blueprint for a new, important kind of social psychology today.

 

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Contents

Part Two Critical Ontologies Paradigms and Methods
57
Part Three Race Ethnicity Inequality
95
Part Four Gender Sexuality Inequality
173
Part Five Class Poverty Inequality
221
Part Six Globalization Conflict Inequality
259
Part Seven Intervention Advocacy Social Policy
351
Part Eight Concluding Perspectives
427
Index
453
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About the author (2018)


Phillip L. Hammack is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Politics, Culture & Identity Lab at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Trained as an interdisciplinary social scientist at the University of Chicago, he uses multiple methods to study the lived experience of social injustice and the relationship between self and society. His current research examines sexual and gender identity diversity in social and political context.

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