Zones of Control: Perspectives on Wargaming

Front Cover
Pat Harrigan, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum
MIT Press, Apr 15, 2016 - Games & Activities - 806 pages

Examinations of wargaming for entertainment, education, and military planning, in terms of design, critical analysis, and historical contexts.

Games with military themes date back to antiquity, and yet they are curiously neglected in much of the academic and trade literature on games and game history. This volume fills that gap, providing a diverse set of perspectives on wargaming's past, present, and future. In Zones of Control, contributors consider wargames played for entertainment, education, and military planning, in terms of design, critical analysis, and historical contexts. They consider both digital and especially tabletop games, most of which cover specific historical conflicts or are grounded in recognizable real-world geopolitics. Game designers and players will find the historical and critical contexts often missing from design and hobby literature; military analysts will find connections to game design and the humanities; and academics will find documentation and critique of a sophisticated body of cultural work in which the complexity of military conflict is represented in ludic systems and procedures.

Each section begins with a long anchoring chapter by an established authority, which is followed by a variety of shorter pieces both analytic and anecdotal. Topics include the history of playing at war; operations research and systems design; wargaming and military history; wargaming's ethics and politics; gaming irregular and non-kinetic warfare; and wargames as artistic practice.

Contributors
Jeremy Antley, Richard Barbrook, Elizabeth M. Bartels, Ed Beach, Larry Bond, Larry Brom, Lee Brimmicombe-Wood, Rex Brynen, Matthew B. Caffrey, Jr., Luke Caldwell, Catherine Cavagnaro, Robert M. Citino, Laurent Closier, Stephen V. Cole, Brian Conley, Greg Costikyan, Patrick Crogan, John Curry, James F. Dunnigan, Robert J. Elder, Lisa Faden, Mary Flanagan, John A. Foley, Alexander R. Galloway, Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi, Don R. Gilman, A. Scott Glancy, Troy Goodfellow, Jack Greene, Mark Herman, Kacper Kwiatkowski, Tim Lenoir, David Levinthal, Alexander H. Levis, Henry Lowood, Elizabeth Losh, Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Rob MacDougall, Mark Mahaffey, Bill McDonald, Brien J. Miller, Joseph Miranda, Soraya Murray, Tetsuya Nakamura, Michael Peck, Peter P. Perla, Jon Peterson, John Prados, Ted S. Raicer, Volko Ruhnke, Philip Sabin, Thomas C. Schelling, Marcus Schulzke, Miguel Sicart, Rachel Simmons, Ian Sturrock, Jenny Thompson, John Tiller, J. R. Tracy, Brian Train, Russell Vane, Charles Vasey, Andrew Wackerfuss, James Wallis, James Wallman, Yuna Huh Wong

 

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User Review  - Jean_Sexton - LibraryThing

It took a long time to finish this massive (over 800 pages and more than 50 chapters) and important work. For people who are involved in wargames, be they hobbyist, professional military, game ... Read full review

Contents

How a Hobby Miniaturized War
3
2 The History of Wargaming Project
33
3 The Fundamental Gap Between Tabletop Simulation Games and the Truth
43
Tracing One Element in The Evolution Of A Game Design
49
Representing Air Warfaire in Games
55
6 Historical Aesthetics in Mapmaking
63
War and Comat in Tabletop RolePlaying Games
71
II War Engines
81
33 War Games
399
Miniature War in Iraq
409
VI The War Room
419
35 Wargames as an Academic Instrument
421
Wargames and the Military Historian
439
The Case for Wargames in the History Classroom
447
For Fun and Profit
455
Utilizing Twilight Struggle for Historical Inquiry
463

Wargames as Systems From th Tabletop to the Computer
83
9 The Engine of Wargaming
107
The Common Language of Advanced Squad Leader
113
Time to Throw Your Plan Away
121
The Next Evolution of the CardDriven Game Engine
133
13 The Paths of Glory Lead But to the Gambling Table
141
The Culture of Wargame Scenario Design Communities
149
III Operations
157
Riding the Cycle of Research
159
16 The Application of Statistical and Forensics Validations to Suimulation Modeling in Wargames
183
17 GoalDriven Design and Napoleons Triumph
201
An Original Serious Game
209
19 The Development and Application of the RealTime Air Power Wargame Simulation Modern Air Power
221
20 Red vs Blue
229
21 Hypergaming
241
IV The Bleeding Edge
251
Naturalizing the New American Way of War
253
23 Creating Persian Incursion
281
24 Modeling the Second Battle of Fallujah
289
Authenticity and Metagaming in World War I Video Games
295
26 Americas Army
303
Player Complicity and Ethical Gameplay in Call of Duty Modern Warfare
309
The Line
319
V Systems and Situations
329
29 Wargames as Writing Systems
331
Gender Just War and Game Design
355
31 Debords Nostalgic Algorithm
371
32 The Ludic Science Club Crosses the Berezina
391
40 ModelDriven Military Wargame Design and Evaluation
471
VII Irregularities
483
41 Gaming the Nonkinetic
485
An Approach to Educational and Analytical Gaming at the US Department of Defense
503
Gaming Modern Insurgency
513
The Kobayashi Maru of the Wargaming World
531
When Military Action Meets Religious Strife
539
Understanding CrossCultural Communications Using Wargames
545
VIII Other Theaters
553
47 Wargaming as Literature
555
Toby and Trims Wargames and the Bowling Green
573
49 Third Reich and The Third Reich
587
50 How Star Fleet Battles Happened
593
Games Workshop and Warhammer 40000
603
52 When the Drums Begin to Roll
623
TwentiethCentury War Reenactors and the Private Event
629
IX Fight the Future
639
Drones and Losing Control of Battlespace
641
55 How to Sell Wargames to the NonWargamer
669
56 Wargaming the Cyber Frontier
673
57 The Unfulfilled Promise of Digital Wargames
681
Shifting Perspective in This War of Mine
691
59 Practicing a New Wargame
703
Acknowledgments and Permissions
709
References
711
Index
773
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Pat Harrigan is a freelance writer and editor, most recently of Zones of Control: Perspectives on Wargaming, coedited with Matthew Kirschenbaum (MIT Press). His work has been published widely and he is the author of a novel, Lost Clusters, and a collection of short stories, Thin Times and Thin Places.

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Maryland and the author of the award-winning Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination (MIT Press).

James F. Dunnigan has written more than 100 books and articles about warfare and diplomacy. A resident of New York City, he is a military analyst for MSNBC and has been a consultant to the State Department, the CIA, and the Army War College.

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