Against the Profit Motive: The Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780-1940

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Yale University Press, Oct 22, 2013 - Political Science - 568 pages
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In America today, a public official's lawful income consists of a salary. But until a century ago, the law frequently provided for officials to make money on a profit-seeking basis. Prosecutors won a fee for each defendant convicted. Tax collectors received a percentage of each evasion uncovered. Naval officers took a reward for each ship sunk. Numerous other officers were likewise paid for "performance." This book is the first to document the American government's for-profit past, to discover how profit-seeking defined officialdom's relationship to the citizenry, and to explain how lawmakers--by ultimately banishing the profit motive in favor of the salary--transformed that relationship forever.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
FACILITATIVE PAYMENTS TO SALARIES
49
BOUNTIES TO SALARIES
181
The Salary Revolution and American StateBuilding
359
Public Prosecutors Dates of Transition from Fees to Salaries by Jurisdiction
363
List of Abbreviations
367
Notes
371
Index
543
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Nicholas R. Parrillo is associate professor of law at Yale University.

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