Across Legal Lines: Jews and Muslims in Modern Morocco

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Yale University Press, Jan 1, 2016 - Interfaith relations - 314 pages
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A previously untold story of Jewish-Muslim relations in modern Morocco, showing how law facilitated Jews' integration into the broader Moroccan society in which they lived

Morocco went through immense upheaval in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Through the experiences of a single Jewish family, Jessica Marglin charts how the law helped Jews to integrate into Muslim society--until colonial reforms abruptly curtailed their legal mobility. Drawing on a broad range of archival documents, Marglin expands our understanding of contemporary relations between Jews and Muslims and changes the way we think about Jewish history, the Middle East, and the nature of legal pluralism.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Legal World of Moroccan Jews
21
2 The Law of the Market
53
3 Breaking and Blurring Jurisdictional Bound aries
77
4 The Sultans Jews
102
5 Appeals in an International Age
123
6 Extraterritorial Expansion
144
7 Colonial Pathos
171
Epilogue
197
Notes
205
Bibliography
279
Index
307
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About the author (2016)

Jessica M. Marglin is assistant professor of religion and the Ruth Ziegler Early Career Chair in Jewish Studies at the University of Southern California. Marglin lives in Los Angeles, CA.

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