Witchcraft Narratives in Germany: Rothenburg, 1561-1652

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Manchester University Press, Jun 28, 2003 - History - 248 pages
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Given the widespread belief in witchcraft and the existence of laws against such practices, why did witch trials fail to gain momentum and escalate into "witch-crazes" in certain parts of early modern Europe? This book answers this question by focussing on the exceptionally rich legal records of the German city of Rothenburg ob der Tauber. This city is significant in that it experienced a very restrained pattern of witch trials--with just one execution for witchcraft--between 1561 and 1652.
 

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Contents

An honourable man should not talk about that which he cannot
14
elite beliefs about witchcraft
48
the Catholic challenge
105
gender and contemporary
135
the idioms and risks
180
Conclusion
206
Bibliography
229
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About the author (2003)

Alison Rowlands is Lecturer in European History, University fo Essex.

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