Nietzsche and the Feminine

Front Cover
Peter J. Burgard
University of Virginia Press, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 349 pages

In this innovative and wide-ranging volume, Peter Burgard has brought together new studies by outstanding scholars in philosophy, feminism, comparative literature, and German studies.

 

Contents

Nietzsches Family Romance
35
Nietzsches Abjection
53
Figures of the Feminine
69
Nietzsche and the Figure of Woman
71
Rhythms of Oblivion
82
Fear of Music? Nietzsches Double Vision of the MusicalFeminine
104
Beyond Antifeminism
133
The Sexual Dialectic of Palingenesis
135
Nietzsche and Cixous on the Logic of the Gift
210
The Question of Nietzsche the Question of Gender and Transformations of Theory
230
Digression
255
From Nietzsche to Psychotherapy
257
Supplements
287
Against Nothing
289
Ecce Mulier? Fragments
316
Bibliography
335

On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Reading Nietzsche for Feminists
158
Feminist Philosophy
183
Remarks on Luce Irigarays Amante marine
185
Contributors
339
Index
343
Copyright

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Page 9 - Europe has decreased proportionately as her rights and claims have increased; and the "emancipation of woman," insofar as that is demanded and promoted by women themselves ( and not merely by shallow males) is thus seen to be an odd symptom of the increasing weakening and dulling of the most feminine instincts. There is stupidity in this movement, an almost masculine stupidity of which a woman who had turned out well— and such women are always prudent— would have to be thoroughly ashamed.