The Nation's Nature: How Continental Presumptions Gave Rise to the United States of America

Front Cover
University of Virginia Press, 2011 - History - 402 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

In one of Common Sense's most ringing phrases, Thomas Paine declared it "absurd" for "a continent to be perpetually governed by an island." Such powerful words, coupled with powerful ideas, helped spur the United States to independence.

In The Nation's Nature, James D. Drake examines how a relatively small number of inhabitants of the Americas, huddled along North America's east coast, came to mentally appropriate the entire continent and to think of their nation as America. Drake demonstrates how British North American colonists' participation in scientific debates and imperial contests shaped their notions of global geography. These ideas, in turn, solidified American nationalism, spurred a revolution, and shaped the ratification of the Constitution.

Winner of the Walker Cowen Memorial Prize for an outstanding work of scholarship in eighteenth-century studies

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

James D. Drake, Professor of History at Metropolitan State University of Denver, is the author of King Philip's War: Civil War in New England, 1675-1676.

Bibliographic information