Parks in Peril: People, Politics, and Protected Areas

Front Cover
Katrina Brandon, Kent H. Redford, Steven Sanderson
Island Press, 1998 - Business & Economics - 532 pages
Using the experience of the Parks in Peril program -- a wide-ranging project instituted by The Nature Conservancy and its partner organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to foster better park management -- this book presents a broad analysis of current trends in park management and the implications for biodiversity conservation. It examines the context of current park management and challenges many commonly held views from social, political, and ecological perspectives. The book argues that: biodiversity conservation is inherently political sustainable use has limitations as a primary tool for biodiversity conservation effective park protection requires understanding the social context at varying scales of analysis actions to protect parks need a level of conceptual rigor that has been absent from recent programs built around slogans and stereotypesNine case studies highlight the interaction of ecosystems, local peoples, and policy in park management, and describe the context of field-based conservation from the perspective of those actually implementing the programs. Parks in Peril builds from the case studies and specific park-level concerns to a synthesis of findings from the sites. The editors draw on the case studies to challenge popular conceptions about parks and describe future directions that can ensure long-term biodiversity conservation.Throughout, contributors argue that protected areas are extremely important for the protection of biodiversity, yet such areas cannot be expected to serve as the sole means of biodiversity conservation. Requiring them to carry the entire burden of conservation is a recipe for ecological and social disaster.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Neotropical Parks Challenges and Context
20
A Conservation Partnership for
27
An Ecogeographic
37
Analyzing the Social Context at PiP Sites
63
NineNeotropical larks
79
Sierra de las Minas Biosphere Reserve
107
Corcovado National Park
143
Amboro National Park
323
YanachagaChemillen National Park
353
Reality and Reaction Saving INeotropical larks
375
The Social Context of Threats
415
The New Politics of Protected Areas
441
Holding Ground
455
PiP Site Scorecard Criteria
465
Glossary
471

Del Este National Park
193
Ecuador Machafilla National Park
249
Podocarpus National Park
287
The Editors
491
Index
499
Copyright

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Page 7 - diversity in language, religious beliefs, land management practices, art, music, social structure, crop selection, diet, and any number of other attributes of human...
Page 2 - The trend to promote sustainable use of resources as a means to protect these resources, while politically expedient and intellectually appealing, is not well grounded in biological and ecological knowledge. Not all things can be preserved through use. Not all places should be open to use. Without an understanding of broader ecosystem dynamics at specific sites, strategies promoting sustainable use will lead to substantial losses of biodiversity.

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