The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity in Urban America

Front Cover
Island Press, Jun 12, 2018 - Social Science - 344 pages
0 Reviews
In The Divided City, urban practitioner and scholar Alan Mallach presents a detailed picture of what has happened over the past 15 to 20 years in industrial cities like Pittsburgh and Baltimore, as they have undergone unprecedented, unexpected revival. He spotlights these changes while placing them in their larger economic, social and political context. Most importantly, he explores the pervasive significance of race in American cities, and looks closely atthe successes and failures of city governments, nonprofit entities, and citizens as they have tried to address the challenges of change. The Divided City concludes with strategies to foster greater equality and opportunity, firmly grounding them in the cities' economic and political realities.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity in Urban America (None)

User Review  - Publishers Weekly

Mallach (Bringing Buildings Back) digs into the dark side of America’s urban revival in this uneven analysis of the forces reshaping “legacy” cities—the Clevelands, Milwaukees, and Buffalos of the ... Read full review

Contents

Revival and Inequity
1
1 The Rise and Fall of the American Industrial City
13
2 Millenials Immigrants and the Shrinking Middle Class
33
3 From Factories to Eds and Meds
49
4 Race Poverty and Real Estate
75
5 Gentrification and Its Discontents
97
The Other Side of Neighborhood Change
123
Small Cities Mill Towns and Struggling Suburbs
145
The Struggle to Escape the Poverty Trap
203
Finding the Will to Change
235
11 A Path to Inclustion and Opportunity
255
References
293
About the Author
315
Index
317
IP Board of Directors
327
Copyright

Confronting the Challenge of Place
173

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2018)

Alan Mallach is a senior fellow at the Center for Community Progress in Washington DC. A city planner, advocate and writer, he is widely known for his work on housing, economic development, and urban revitalization. A former director of housing & economic development in Trenton, New Jersey, and a former non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, he teaches in the graduate city planning program at Pratt Institute.

Bibliographic information