The Shape Shifter

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Harper Collins, Nov 21, 2006 - Fiction - 368 pages
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Since his retirement from the Navajo Tribal Police, Joe Leaphorn has occasionally been enticed to return to work by former colleagues who seek his help when they need to solve a particularly puzzling crime. They ask because Leaphorn, aided by officers Jim Chee and Bernie Manuelito, always delivers.

But this time the problem is with an old case of Joe's—his "last case," unsolved, and one that continues to haunt him. And with Chee and Bernie just back from their honeymoon, Leaphorn is pretty much on his own.

The original case involved a priceless, one-of-a-kind Navajo rug supposedly destroyed in a fire. Suddenly, what looks like the same rug turns up in a magazine spread. And the man who brings the photo to Leaphorn's attention has gone missing. Leaphorn must pick up the threads of a crime he'd thought impossible to untangle. Not only has the passage of time obscured the details, but it also appears that there's a murderer still on the loose.

 

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The shape shifter

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Hillerman's latest venture (after Skeleton Man ) into the familiar world of the Navajo reservation in Arizona and New Mexico is not his best, but it will still be enjoyed by his loyal fans. Sgt. Jim ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
11
Section 3
23
Section 4
31
Section 5
37
Section 6
57
Section 7
63
Section 8
69
Section 14
151
Section 15
161
Section 16
213
Section 17
263
Section 18
285
Section 19
295
Section 20
311
Section 21
321

Section 9
89
Section 10
99
Section 11
109
Section 12
115
Section 13
135
Section 22
333
Section 23
343
Section 24
347
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Tony Hillerman was the former president of the Mystery Writers of America and received its EdgarŽ and Grand Master awards. His other honors include the Center for the American Indian’s Ambassador Award, the Silver Spur Award for the best novel set in the West, and the Navajo Tribe’s Special Friend Award. He lived with his wife in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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