Data Structures and Algorithms in Java

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Prentice Hall, 2006 - Computers - 568 pages
This new book provides a concise and engaging introduction to Java and object-oriented programming with an abundance of original examples, use of Unified Modeling Language throughout, and coverage of the new Java 1.5. Addressing critical concepts up front, the book's five-part structure covers object-oriented programming, linear structures, algorithms, trees and collections, and advanced topics. KEY FEATURES: Data Structures and Algorithms in Java takes a practical approach to real-world programming and introduces readers to the process of crafting programs by working through the development of projects, often providing multiple versions of the code and consideration for alternate designs. The book features the extensive use of games as examples; a gradual development of classes analogous to the Java Collections Framework; complete, working code in the book and online; and strong pedagogy including extended examples in most chapters along with exercises, problems and projects. For readers and professionals with a familiarity with the basic control structures of Java or C and a precalculus level of mathematics who want to expand their knowledge to Java data structures and algorithms. Ideal for a second undergraduate course in computer science.

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it is marvellous book on data structure but a problem is there that some pages are missing .

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

看起来还不错。好像挺新颖的一本教材。有中文译版,朱剑平译

Contents

DraCh01ffpdf
3
DraCh02ffpdf
37
DraCh03ffpdf
67
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About the author (2006)

Peter Drake is Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Lewis &

Clark College in Portland, Oregon. He holds a BA in English from

Willamette University, an MS in Computer Science from Oregon State

University, and a PhD in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from

Indiana University. His research involves writing programs to play

the ancient Chinese game of Go.

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