The Communist Manifesto

Front Cover
Penguin, 2002 - Political Science - 287 pages
81 Reviews
Originally published on the eve of the 1848 European revolutions, The Communist Manifesto is a condensed and incisive account of the worldview Marx and Engels developed during their hectic intellectual and political collaboration. Formulating the principles of dialectical materialism, they believed that labor creates wealth, hence capitalism is exploitive and antithetical to freedom.

This new edition includes an extensive introduction by Gareth Stedman Jones, Britain's leading expert on Marx and Marxism, providing a complete course for students of The Communist Manifesto, and demonstrating not only the historical importance of the text, but also its place in the world today.
 

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User Review  - bdtrump - LibraryThing

Read this years ago in high school, and decided to take another look as a graduate student. As one of Marx's major works, he articulates a desire for a shift away from corporatism, familial ... Read full review

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Contents

I
3
II
14
III
27
IV
39
V
50
VI
70
VII
74
VIII
82
XX
193
XXI
195
XXII
197
XXIII
199
XXIV
205
XXV
212
XXVI
215
XXVII
218

IX
90
X
99
XI
120
XII
140
XIII
145
XV
148
XVI
162
XVII
177
XVIII
185
XIX
191
XXVIII
219
XXIX
234
XXX
245
XXXI
247
XXXII
248
XXXIII
257
XXXIV
259
XXXV
277
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Born in Westphalia in 1820, Friedrich Engels was the son of a textile manufacturer. After military training in Berlin and already a convert to communism, Engels went to Manchester in 1842 to represent the family firm. A relationship with a mill-hand, Mary Bums, and friendship with local Owenites and Chartists helped to inspire his famous early work, The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844. Collaboration with Marx began in 1844 and in 1847 he composed the first drafts of the Manifesto. After playing an active part in the German revolutions, Engels returned to work in Manchester until 1870, when he moved to London. He not only helped Marx financially, but reinforced their shared position through his own expositions of the new theory. After Marx's death, he prepared the unfinished volumes of Capital for publication. He died in London in 1895.

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