Feathers

Front Cover
Penguin, 2010 - JUVENILE FICTION - 118 pages
52 Reviews
A Newbery Honor Book

A beautiful and moving novel from a three-time Newbery Honor-winning author

Jacqueline Woodson is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People's Literature


"Hope is the thing with feathers" starts the poem Frannie is reading in school. Frannie hasn't thought much about hope. There are so many other things to think about. Each day, her friend Samantha seems a bit more "holy." There is a new boy in class everyone is calling the Jesus Boy. And although the new boy looks like a white kid, he says he's not white. Who is he?

During a winter full of surprises, good and bad, Frannie starts seeing a lot of things in a new light--her brother Sean's deafness, her mother's fear, the class bully's anger, her best friend's faith and her own desire for "the thing with feathers."

Jacqueline Woodson once again takes readers on a journey into a young girl's heart and reveals the pain and the joy of learning to look beneath the surface.


"[Frannie] is a wonderful role model for coming of age in a thoughtful way, and the book offers to teach us all about holding on to hope."--Children's Literature

"A wonderful and necessary purchase for public and school libraries alike."--VOYA

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - alaina.loescher - LibraryThing

This book is great in that discrimination in books is often tackled through a 1950-1960's lens, when school integration was still fresh. In many of these books, it is implied that discrimination ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Msnem - LibraryThing

Frannie is a sixth grader who grapples with the meaning of Emily Dickinson’s poem, “Hope” is a Thing With Feathers. Throughout the story, she learns more about hope and what it means to her, her deaf ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
7
Section 3
20
Section 4
41
Section 5
48
Section 6
61
Section 7
69
Section 8
84
Section 12
125
Section 13
127
Section 14
130
Section 15
134
Section 16
143
Section 17
145
Section 18
147
Section 19
149

Section 9
116
Section 10
119
Section 11
123
Section 20
150
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Jacqueline Woodson (www.jacquelinewoodson.com) is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, and she received the 2018 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award. She is the 2014 National Book Award Winner for her New York Times bestselling memoir BROWN GIRL DREAMING, which was also a recipient of the Coretta Scott King Award, a Newbery Honor Award, the NAACP Image Award and the Sibert Honor Award. Woodson was recently named the Young People's Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation. Her recent adult book, Another Brooklyn, was a National Book Award finalist. Born on February 12th in Columbus, Ohio, Jacqueline Woodson grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, and Brooklyn, New York and graduated from college with a B.A. in English. She is the author of more than two dozen award-winning books for young adults, middle graders and children; among her many accolades, she is a four-time Newbery Honor winner, a four-time National Book Award finalist, and a two-time Coretta Scott King Award winner. Her books include THE OTHER SIDE, EACH KINDNESS, Caldecott Honor Book COMING ON HOME SOON; Newbery Honor winners FEATHERS, SHOW WAY, and AFTER TUPAC AND D FOSTER, and MIRACLE'S BOYS--which received the LA Times Book Prize and the Coretta Scott King Award and was adapted into a miniseries directed by Spike Lee. Jacqueline is also the recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement for her contributions to young adult literature, the winner of the Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and was the 2013 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award. She lives with her family in Brooklyn, New York.