One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd

Front Cover
St. Martin's Press, Feb 15, 1999 - Fiction - 496 pages
147 Reviews

One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to the western prairies in 1875 to intermarry among the Cheyenne Indians. The covert and controversial "Brides for Indians" program, launched by the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, is intended to help assimilate the Indians into the white man's world. Toward that end May and her friends embark upon the adventure of their lifetime. Jim Fergus has so vividly depicted the American West that it is as if these diaries are a capsule in time.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
43
4 stars
52
3 stars
32
2 stars
12
1 star
8

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - beckyhaase - LibraryThing

I thought this book was a satire, or a racist screed or a joke. It actually is pretty good and has several redeeming qualities. The characters are realistic and clearly drawn. The situations ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gypsysmom - LibraryThing

What an enthralling book! This journal of a white woman of a privileged background in Chicago who goes to live with Cheyenne Indians in what is now Wyoming and Montana is a work of fiction. However ... Read full review

All 36 reviews »

Other editions - View all

References to this book

About the author (1999)

Jim Fergus is field editor and monthly columnist for sports Afield magazine and also writes a monthly feature on the AllOutdoors.com Web site. His work has appeared in numerous national magazines and newspapers, and he is the author of the nonfiction book A Hunter's Road. He lives in northern Colorado.

Bibliographic information