The Return of Tarzan

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Ballantine Books, 1963 - Fiction - 221 pages
13 Reviews
Tarzan had renounced his right to the woman he loved, and civilization held no pleasure for him. After a brief and harrowing period among men, he turned back to the African jungle where he had grown to manhood. It was there he first heard of Opar, the city of gold, left over from fabled Atlantis.
It was a city of hideous men -- and of beautiful, savage women, over whom reigned La, high priestess of the Flaming God. Its altars were stained with the blood of many sacrifices. Unheeding of the dangers, Tarzan led a band of savage warriors toward the ancient crypts and the more ancient evil of Opar . . .
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

Many people probably do not know (and I had forgotten until I started rereading this) that the original Tarzan of the Apes ends up with Tarzan nobly renouncing the hand of Jane (and his title of Lord ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nx74defiant - LibraryThing

Tarzan goes on a series of adventures. He always comes out ahead in the end. Sometimes a bit contrived. Tarzan and Jane get together at the end. Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER PAGE The Affair on the Liner
7
Ill What Happened in the Rue Maule
23
The Countess Explains
31
The Plot That Failed
40
A Duel
48
The Dancing Girl of Sidi Aissa
56
Vill The Fight in the Desert
64
Numa El Adrea
72
Ships That Pass
97
XIll The Wreck of the Lady Alice
105
Back to the Primitive
116
From Ape to Savage
125
The Ivory Raiders
133
The White Chief of the Waziri
141
XVIIl The Lottery of Death
150
The City of Gold
159

Through the Valley of the Shadow
81
John Caldwell London
89
La
167
Copyright

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About the author (1963)

Edgar Rice Burroughs is one of the world's most popular authors. With no previous experience as a writer, he wrote and sold his first novel--A Princess of Mars--in 1912. In the ensuing 38 years, until his death in 1950, Burroughs produced 91 books and a host of short stories and articles. Although he is best known as the creator of the classic Tarzan of the Apes and John Carter of Mars, his restless imagination knew few bounds. Burroughs's prolific pen took readers from the American West to Africa to romantic adventures on the moon and beyond the farthest star.

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