Down to Earth

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Random House Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2001 - Fiction - 624 pages
6 Reviews
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In 1942 Hitler led the world's most savage military machine. Stalin ruled Russia while America was just beginning to show its strength in World War II. Then, in Harry Turtledove's brilliantly imagined Worldwar saga, an alien assault changed everything. Nuclear destruction engulfed major cities, and the invaders claimed half the planet before an uneasy peace could be achieved.

A spectacular tale of tyranny and freedom, destruction and hope, Colonization takes us into the tumultuous 1960s, as the reptilian Race ponders its uneasy future. But now a new, even deadlier war threatens. Though the clamoring tribes of Earth play dangerous games of diplomacy, the ultimate power broker will be the Race itself. For the colonists have one option no human can ignore. With a vast, ancient empire already in place, the Race has the power to annihilate every living being on planet Earth . . .

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

The equivalent WWII ends with the Earth divided between the lizards and the humans. The next round is under way with the arrival of the colonization, as opposed to the conquest, fleet. The splits on either side between hard-liners and compromisers deepen. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RandyStafford - LibraryThing

My reaction to reading this novel in 2000. Spoilers follow. The second and enjoyable installment in Turtledove’s Colonization series packed some surprises: the Germans foolishly provoking war against ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Harry Turtledove was born in Los Angeles in 1949. After flunking out of Caltech, he earned a Ph.D. in Byzantine history from UCLA. He has taught ancient and medieval history at UCLA, Cal State Fullerton, and Cal State L.A., and has published a translation of a ninth-century Byzantine chronicle, as well as several scholarly articles. His alternate history works have included many short stories and the Civil War classic The Guns of the South, the World War I epic Great War series, and the Worldwar tetralogy that began with Worldwar: In the Balance. He is a Hugo winner, a Nebula finalist, and the winner of the Sidewise Award for best Alternate History for his novel How Few Remain.