The Bones in the Cliff

Front Cover
Bantam Doubleday Dell Books for Young Readers, 1996 - Criminals - 119 pages
1 Review
And day now the big man with the cigar might be arriving on the ferryboat--the man that Pete's father is terrified to see. So three times a day, when the ferry is due at the island, Pete jumps on his bike and races to see if the big man will get off the boat. In Pete's pocket is a quarter, so he can rush to the telephone and warn his father. It is not until almost the end of summer that Pete finds out why his father is so afraid. But in the meantime he has met eleven-year-old Rootie, an old-timer on Cutlass Island, who shows him the island newcomers never see--and who helps him face the danger when it finally arrives. Any day now the big man with the cigar might be arriving on the ferryboat - the man that Pete's father is terrified to see. So three times a day, when the ferry is due at the island, Pete jumps on his bike and races to see if the big man will get off the boat. In Pete's pocket is a quarter, so he can rush to the telephone and warn his father. It is not until almost the end of summer that Pete finds out why his father is so afraid. But in the meantime he has met eleven-year-old Rootie, an old-timer on Cutlass Island, who shows him the island newcomers never see - and who helps him face the danger when it finally arrives.

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Contents

The Man on the Boat
1
Rootie
3
Blackbeards Cove
8
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

James Stevenson was born in Manhattan, New York on July 11, 1929. He graduated from Yale University. He was a reporter from Life magazine before being hired by The New Yorker in 1956. He drew 1,988 cartoons, 79 covers, and wrote and illustrated articles including Talk of the Town pieces for the magazine. He also drew editorial cartoons for The New York Times and in 2004 began an occasional series for the Op-Ed page entitled Lost and Found New York, which looked back on people and places of the past. He wrote and/or illustrated more than 100 children's books including Don't You Know There's a War On, The Worst Person in the World, Higher on the Door, The Mud Flat Olympics, Yard Sale, The Mud Flat Mystery, What's Under My Bed, That Terrible Halloween Night, and Worse Than Willy. In 1987, he won the Caldecott Honor for When I Was Nine. He also wrote novels and an illustrated biography of Frank Modell, a fellow New Yorker cartoonist. He died of pneumonia on February 17, 2017 at the age of 87.

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