Cuba 1952-1959: The True Story of Castro's Rise to Power

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Kleiopatria Digital Press, 2009 - Cuba - 276 pages
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Author Manuel Marquez-Sterling writes about Fidel Castro and his revolution from direct personal experience, as a historian with broad and deep knowledge of 50s Cuba. The author knew and had contact with many of the historical figures in the book's pages. His penetrating analysis of the public and behind-the-scenes events clears the fog and shatters myths to reveal the real story of the Cuban Revolution. The book explains how Castro came to power through the convergence of rabid partisanship, radical student politics, media bias, and venal politicians who placed self interest ahead of preserving democracy. Facing a constitutional crisis, these parties espoused "the end justifies the means," embracing political gangsterism and eschewing negotiations with political opponents- resulting in a power vacuum Castro exploited to seize power. Masterful propaganda cast Castro as pro-democracy hero, avoiding scrutiny of his plans for a totalitarian state under his control."
 

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Contents

CUBA BEFORE CASTRO
1
The Lost Republic
16
The Third Man
22
The Coups Immediate Aftermath
30
First Reactions Against the New Regime
36
Castro Keeps His Word
48
Elections
56
Castros Reaction in Miami
69
The Presidential Palace Attack
101
The Bicameral Commission Under Fire
114
A Crucial Date in Cuban History
127
The Constitutional Bill of Rights Is Again Restored
134
Castro Embarrasses the United States
149
MárquezSterling vs Castro
164
Labor
187
APPENDIX
205

The Granma Expedition
84
Herbert Matthews Intervenes in the Cuban Drama
88

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About the author (2009)

Manuel Marquez-Sterling was born in Havana, Cuba. He has lived in the US since 1960. He is Professor Emeritus of History at Plymouth State University. His publications include Historia de la Isla de Cuba (co-authored with his father, Carlos Marquez-Sterling), Carlos Marquez-Sterling: Memorias de un Estadista, and "Fernan Gonzalez, First Count of Castile: the man and the legend." He is also known for his acclaimed historical novels La Cupula and Hondo Corre el Cauto. The latter topped the Miami Nuevo Heraldo best seller list. An accomplished playwright, his works in that genre include La Salsa del Diablo (The Devil's Sauce), which won the Madrid-Miami Letras de Oro Award in 1993, and Corneille's Dream, winner of the 1996 Southern New Hampshire University Spectrum Award for One Act Play. Following the example of his grandfather (Manuel Marquez-Sterling [1872-1934]), the author also writes a long running op-ed column for the (Spanish language) Diario Las Americas. Before becoming a historian he studied law at the University of Havana in the 50s, where at graduation he received the Ricardo Dolz Arango National Law Award, the top University of Havana law student prize. His law practice in Cuba included serving as Public Defender and arguing a constitutional law case before Cuba's Supreme Court.

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