A Software Architecture Primer

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Software Architecture Primer, 2006 - Computers - 179 pages
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A Software Architecture Primer presents a fresh, pragmatic approach to the study of software architecture. Written by two practitioners with extensive industry and academic experience, it contains a series of chapters that introduce and develop an understanding of software architecture, by means of careful explanation and elaboration of a range of key concepts. Chapters on architectural analysis and design, on fundamental views of complex software systems, and on architectural styles and quality attributes, combine to ensure that the reader or student will master the art of "architectural thinking." This book will be of value to anyone involved in software systems analysis, design, or development. A complete set of course materials is available to support the use of this book as an undergraduate or post-graduate textbook.
 

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buen libro para quienes quiere iniciarse en la arquitectura de software en bien corto y facil de leer.

Contents

First Chapter
1
Bibliography
173

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Page 173 - Scenario-Based Design: Envisioning Work and Technology in System Development', John Wiley and Sons, pp 309-336.
Page 173 - Bass, L, Clements, P. and Kazman, R. (2003) Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition, AddisonWesley, Boston Baumard, P.
Page 174 - Tools, 19:37^8. [Herrmann and Mezini, 2000] Herrmann, S. and Mezini, M. (2000). PIROL: a case study for multidimensional separation of concerns in software engineering environments. ACM SIGPLAN Notices, 35(10):188-207. [Hofmeister et al., 2000] Hofmeister, C., Nord, R., and Soni, D. (2000). Applied Software Architecture.
Page 173 - Brooks, FP (1974). The Mythical Man Month and Other Essays on Software Engineering. Addison Wesley Longman Publishing Company.
Page 174 - Cusumano, MA and Selby, RW (1997). How Microsoft builds software.

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