Falkenberg's Legion

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Baen Books, 1990 - Fiction - 432 pages
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The seeds of contradiction that lay at the heart of the Soviet-American alliance are bearing their final fruit. Soon they will rip the Codomminium apart - and Earth will die. In the face of that inevitability the fate of humanity lies with the Colony Worlds - a few of which are equipped for more than barest survival. Thrown upon their own resources, their futures seem as limited as their pasts. They - and humanity - have one hope: that somehow, someone will have both the vision and the strength to grasp the tattered remnants of civilization and weld them into a single galaxy-spanning society.

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User Review  - BruderBane - LibraryThing

Now and again when I am reading a new novel I will find myself dragging my own psyche through the story. Oftentimes this is due to the fact that I’m feeling run down or a bit tired. On the other hand ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Jerry Eugene Pournelle was born in Shreveport, Louisiana on August 7, 1933. During the Korean War, he served in the U. S. Army. He received a B.S. in psychology in 1955, an M.S. in psychology in 1958, and a Ph.D. in political science in 1964 from the University of Washington. He worked for Boeing and NASA where he worked on the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions. He also advised the federal government on military matters and space exploration. He wrote science fiction and helped popularize the military science fiction genre. His first novel, Red Heroin, was published in 1969 under the pen name Wade Curtis. His other novels published under his own name included Janissaries, Starswarm, and The Mercenary. He also wrote novels with Larry Niven including Oath of Fealty, The Mote in God's Eye, Lucifer's Hammer, Inferno, Escape from Hell, and Footfall. Pournelle was widely credited as the first major author to write a published novel entirely on a computer. He wrote a witty advice columns for computer users in Byte magazine. He received the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer of 1973. He died of heart failure on September 8, 2017 at the age of 84.

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