Don't Die Dragonfly

Front Cover
Llewellyn, 2004 - Juvenile Fiction - 269 pages
19 Reviews

After getting kicked out of school and sent to live with her grandmother, Sabine Rose is determined to become a "normal" teenage girl. She hides her psychic powers from everyone, even from her grandmother Nona, who also has "the gift." Having a job at the school newspaper and friends like Penny-Love, a popular cheerleader, have helped Sabine fit in at her new school. She has even managed to catch the eye of the adorable Josh DeMarco.

Yet, Sabine can't seem to get the bossy voice of Opal, her spirit guide, out of her head . . . or the disturbing images of a girl with a dragonfly tattoo. Suspected of a crime she didn't commit, Sabine must find the strength to defend herself and, later, save a friend from certain danger.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - krau0098 - LibraryThing

I have had this book forever on my Kindle and finally decided to give it a read. I believe there are six book in this series right now. This was a very quick read and was okay. The dialogue throughout ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ShirleyMcLain930 - LibraryThing

This is an excellent book about a young girl with powers she was ashamed she possessed. She had to leave her mother's house and go live with her Grandmother who shared her gift. You follow the girl through the ups and downs of her dealing with her psychic abilities. Easy reading. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

With plots involving twins, cheerleaders, ghosts, psychics and clones, Linda Joy Singleton has published over 25 midgrade and YA books. When she's not writing, she enjoys life in the country with a barnyard of animals including horses, cats, dogs and pigs. She especially loves to hear from readers and speaking at schools and libraries. She collects vintage series books like Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden and Judy Bolton. When Linda is asked why she'd rather write for kids than adults, she says, "I love seeing the world through the heart of a child, where magic is real and every day begins a new adventure. I hope to inspire them to reach for their dreams. Writing for kids is a gift, a responsibility, and an honor.

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